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Glycocalyx (Cell Coat)

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Abstract

The outer surface of all animal cells is covered by a glycocalyx composed of oligosaccharides (glycans) of glycoproteins and glycolipids and a layer of secreted mucus particularly in the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. The biological roles of the glycocalyx are diverse. In general terms, it exerts stabilising and protective functions. Specific functions are related to the glycan structure and cell type and to specific recognition and interaction of glycans with other molecules. Certain glycans are important for development and differentiation of organs through modulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and signalling. They also can function as receptors for certain pathogens or may represent ligands for various receptors and can be involved in turnover and trafficking of molecules.

Keywords

  • Sialic Acid
  • Glycan Structure
  • Urogenital Tract
  • Histochem Cell Biol
  • Adhere Mucus

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Pavelka, M., Roth, J. (2010). Glycocalyx (Cell Coat). In: Functional Ultrastructure. Springer, Vienna. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-211-99390-3_84

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