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Offshoring: Why Do Stories Differ?

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Part of the Schriftenreihe der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Europaforschung (ECSA Austria) / European Community Studies Association of Austria Publication Series book series (EUROPAFORSCH,volume 12)

Abstract

This paper identifies critical modelling choices, as well as differences in the driving forces behind offshoring, that may explain differences in results. Offshoring of industry-specific tasks has wage and employment effects that are vastly different from those identified in (2006), depending on how the industries differ in their average and marginal skill-intensities, respectively. Structural adjustment may occur at the intensive margin and the extensive margin (offshoring), and it may occur in opposite directions or the same direction at both margins, again depending on how industries differ in terms of their average and marginal skill-intensity.

I wish to acknowledge financial support received from Fritz Thyssen Foundation under grant no Az. 10.06.1.111. Thanks are due to Christoph Roth for thoughtful and critical remarks on an earlier version of the paper.

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Kohler, W. (2009). Offshoring: Why Do Stories Differ?. In: Tondl, G. (eds) The EU and Emerging Markets. Schriftenreihe der Österreichischen Gesellschaft für Europaforschung (ECSA Austria) / European Community Studies Association of Austria Publication Series, vol 12. Springer, Vienna. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-211-92662-8_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-211-92662-8_2

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Vienna

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-211-92661-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-211-92662-8