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Brain Perfusion in Patients with Severe Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS) before and after n-CPAP-Therapy

  • C. Dannenberg
  • A. Bosse-Henck
  • A. Weiser
  • H. Barthel
  • U. Schedel
  • B. Sattler
  • J. Dietrich
  • W. H. Knapp
  • W. Burchert
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Pharmacological Sciences book series (APS)

Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of nocturnal transnasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing (n-CPAP-therapy) with respect to regional cerebral blood flow. 30 patients with severe sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) underwent daytime Tc-99m ECD SPET before and after 6 month n-CPAP-therapy and brain CT (n = 25) to evaluate atrophy. SPET data were analysed visually by 3 experts: Perfusion deficits were mainly located in frontal and temporal lobes. Frontal (p< 0.01) and temporal (p< 0.05) activity significantly increased after therapy. In 10 patients with brain atrophy activity did not change significantly, what probably reflects morphological changes induced by hypoxemia and/or sleep fragmentation.

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Brain Perfusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Dannenberg
    • 1
  • A. Bosse-Henck
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Weiser
    • 1
  • H. Barthel
    • 1
  • U. Schedel
    • 1
  • B. Sattler
    • 1
  • J. Dietrich
    • 1
  • W. H. Knapp
    • 1
  • W. Burchert
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nuclear MedicineUniversity of LeipzigGermany
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicineUniversity of LeipzigGermany

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