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Shortest Paths for Satellite Mounted Robot Manipulators

  • V. H. Schulz
  • H. G. Bock
  • R. W. Longman
Chapter
Part of the ISNM International Series of Numerical Mathematics book series (ISNM, volume 115)

Abstract

In ground based robotics the most fundamental form of path planning uses linear interpolation, either in joint space or in cartesian space. It is the purpose of this paper to extend this fundamental path planning method to the space based robotics problem. Space based robotics will often require the manipulation of loads that have a mass that is not negligible compared to that of the satellite on which the robot is mounted. And the manipulation will often be performed with the attitude control system turned off in order to save attitude control fuel. It is nevertheless necessary that the satellite attitude be returned to its original attitude by choice of the robot path. Direct application of linear interpolation fails in this situation, and the analog developed here is to find minimum arc length solutions satisfying the attitude condition. The minimum is in the chosen space, i.e. in joint space, cartesian space for satellite fixed coordinates, or cartesian space for inertial coordinates. This paper presents methods of path planning, and examples of such robot paths, for the second of these alternatives.

Keywords

Short Path Path Planning Satellite Attitude Attitude Control System Cartesian Space 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag Basel 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. H. Schulz
    • 1
  • H. G. Bock
    • 1
  • R. W. Longman
    • 2
  1. 1.Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific ComputingUniversity of HeidelbergHeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Mechanical Engineering DepartmentColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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