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Tetracycline consumption in prehistory

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Abstract

Debra Martin was visiting the Calcified Tissue Laboratory at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, learning to make thin sections of undecalcifiedtarchaeological bone. The objective of her visit was to make slides of bone thin enough to allow the light from the microscope to be transmitted through them. Although modern equipment speeds up the process, Martin, at the time a graduate student at the University of Massachusetts, was using a manual method for grinding the bone to the desired 100-micron thickness. The femoral cross-section is removed from an area just below the lesser trochanter (a few inches below its neck).

Keywords

  • Gingival Crevicular Fluid
  • Periosteal Reaction
  • Cement Line
  • Henry Ford Hospital
  • Brewing Process

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Armelagos, G.J., Kolbacher, K., Collins, K., Cook, J., Krafeld-Daugherty, M. (2001). Tetracycline consumption in prehistory. In: Nelson, M., Hillen, W., Greenwald, R.A. (eds) Tetracyclines in Biology, Chemistry and Medicine. Birkhäuser, Basel. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-0348-8306-1_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-0348-8306-1_9

  • Publisher Name: Birkhäuser, Basel

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-0348-9511-8

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