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Variable α-tocopherol stimulation and protection of glutathione peroxidase activity in non-transformed and transformed fibroblasts

  • C. E. P. Goldring
  • W. L. Hu
  • N. R. Rao
  • C. Rice-Evans
  • R. H. Burdon
  • A. T. Diplock
Part of the EXS book series (EXS, volume 62)

Summary

Studies on glutathione metabolism in an established baby hamster kidney cell line (BHK-21/C13) and in its polyoma virus-transformed counterpart (BHK-21/PyY), have revealed a significant stimulation of intracellular glutathione peroxidase activity (Se-independent plus Se-dependent) by α-tocopherol supplementation (14 µM). This stimulation was found to be much greater in the transformed cells. Other GSH-requiring enzyme activities (namely glutathione reductase and glutathione transferase) were unaltered by α-tocopherol treatment, suggesting a degree of specificity in its action on GSHpx. In unsupplemented growth media, the GSHpx activity in both cell lines was significantly decreased by an oxidative stress. However, the same stress applied to the α-tocopherol-supplemented cells had no effect on the stimulated GSHpx activity, suggesting a protection afforded by the α-tocopherol.

Keywords

Glutathione Peroxidase Glutathione Reductase GSHpx Activity Glutathione Peroxidase Activity Glutathione Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag Basel/Switzerland 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. E. P. Goldring
    • 1
  • W. L. Hu
    • 1
  • N. R. Rao
    • 1
  • C. Rice-Evans
    • 1
  • R. H. Burdon
    • 2
  • A. T. Diplock
    • 1
  1. 1.Free Radical Research Group, Division of Biochemistry, UMDSGuy’s HospitalLondonUK
  2. 2.Department of Bioscience and BiotechnologyUniversity of StrathclydeGlasgowUK

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