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Digital Election Campaigns: Does Professionalization Still Matter?

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Streamlining Political Communication Concepts

Abstract

The idea of professionalization of election campaigning has in recent times been challenged both by rapid digital and social media developments, and by the growth of populist campaign features, anti-establishment parties, and candidates. Still, most empirical evidence so far suggests that the most professionalized competitors also use social media most efficiently, and that populist parties often adapt to more professionalized campaigning when they become part of the political establishment. Professionalization should not be considered a permanent condition with a specific set of outstanding campaign activities for all times, but rather an ongoing process reshuffling campaign components to be able to achieve desired objectives at any given time. Thus, it is still a valid and relevant concept for the understanding of modern election campaigns in democratic states.

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Nord, L. (2023). Digital Election Campaigns: Does Professionalization Still Matter?. In: Salgado, S., Papathanassopoulos, S. (eds) Streamlining Political Communication Concepts. Springer Studies in Media and Political Communication. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-45335-9_7

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