Skip to main content

Power and Built Environment Course Delivery: A Modern Solution to Force Majeure

  • 67 Accesses

Abstract

While the pandemic has seen dramatic changes to higher education delivery and strategy in the past few years, there appears to be a certain continuity in the functioning of power relations in pedagogy. It is argued that teaching and learning online, which was accelerated by the pandemic, transformed not only how education was organised and delivered, and raised expectations about increased transparency, accountability, service orientation, and civic participation but also exacerbated associated fears concerning surveillance and control, privacy issues, power relations, and inequalities. Consequently, Michel Foucault’s critical studies concerning regimes of power are of particular interest when applied to teaching and learning in creative sectors such as Built Environment and Construction in Higher Education Institution (HEI) settings. Teaching Built Environment and Construction courses online has always been seen as pivotal but faced some challenges during the shift to online teaching across HEIs in the UK. It has long been argued that the development of construction professionals requires utilising digital technologies, which can be achieved by working remotely. Equally, there is a vital need to be present and witness the physical development of products and operations in the form of structures. This chapter utilises Foucault’s conception of power relations and governmentality to explore how micro-level techniques of power, such as surveillance, manifested during the pandemic, particularly in the Built Environment and Construction in HEI settings, and created resistance, advocacy, and regulation among the key stakeholders, particularly academics. In this context, we look at Foucault's notions of governmentality and control and how they might be used to critically view managerialism as a manifestation or practice of surveillance. Subsequently, the chapter argues that the new ‘managerialism’ that emerged during the pandemic acts as an emergent and increasingly rationalised and complicated power and control technology that operates at various levels on the individual, both educator and learner, and the broader institution.

Keywords

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD   149.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Hardcover Book
USD   199.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Learn about institutional subscriptions

References

  • Abbasnejad, B., Soltani, S., & Wong, P. (2023, February). A systematic review of online learning and teaching strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic: Implications for the construction management sector. Smart and Sustainable Built Environment.

    Google Scholar 

  • Al Mahameed, M., Yates, D., & Gebreiter, F. (2023, February). Management as ideology: “New” managerialism and the corporate university in the period of Covid‐19. Financial Accountability & Management.

    Google Scholar 

  • Anderson, G. L., & Grinberg, J. (1998). Educational administration as a disciplinary practice: Appropriating Foucault’s view of power, discourse, and method. Educational Administration Quarterly, 34(3), 329–353.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bergdahl, N., & Nouri, J. (2021). Covid-19 and crisis-prompted distance education in Sweden. Technology, Knowledge and Learning, 26(3), 443–459.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Burawoy, M. (2005). For public sociology. American Sociological Review., 70(1), 4–28.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Chan Paul Leong, D. (2021). Assessment of students’ performance in construction management program for online learning amid covid-19. International Journal for Innovative Research in Multidisciplinary Field, 7(12), 90–98.

    Google Scholar 

  • Connell, R. (2013). The neoliberal cascade and education: An essay on the market agenda and its consequences. Critical Studies in Education., 54(2), 99–112.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Deem, R. (1998). “New managerialism” and higher education: The management of performances and cultures in universities in the United Kingdom. International Studies in Sociology of Education., 8(1), 47–70.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Deem, R., Hillyard, S., & Reed, M. (2007). Knowledge, higher education, and the new managerialism: The changing management of UK universities. Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Dick, G., Akbulut, A. Y., & Matta, V. (2020). Teaching and learning transformation in the time of the Coronavirus crisis. Journal of Information Technology Case and Application Research, 22(4), 243–255.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Dorzweiler, N. (2021). Foucault on psychagogy and the politics of education. Contemporary Political Theory, 20, 547–567.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Dost, S., Hossain, A., Shehab, M., Abdelwahed, A., & Al-Nusair, L. (2020). Perceptions of medical students towards online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic: A national cross-sectional survey of 2721 UK medical students. British Medical Journal Open, 10(11), e042378.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ford, M. (2003). Unveiling technologies of power in classroom organization practice. Educational Foundations, 17(2), 5–27.

    Google Scholar 

  • Foucault, M. (1977). Discipline and punish: The birth of the prison (A. Sheridan, Trans.). Allen Lane.

    Google Scholar 

  • Foucault, M. (1982). The subject and power. Critical Inquiry, 8(4), 777–795.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Foucault, M. (2007). Security, territory, population: Lectures at the College de France, 1977–1978 (G. Burchell, Trans.). Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frank, A. I. (2005). What do students value in Built Environment education? Cebe Transactions, 2(3), 21–29.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • García-Alberti, M., Suárez, F., Chiyón, I., & Mosquera Feijoo, J. C. (2021). Challenges and experiences of online evaluation in courses of civil engineering during the lockdown learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Education Sciences, 11(2), 59.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • García-Morales, V. J., Garrido-Moreno, A., & Martín-Rojas, R. (2021). The transformation of higher education after the COVID disruption: Emerging challenges in an online learning scenario. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 616059.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gnaur, D., Svidt, K., & Thygesen, M. K. (2015). Developing students’ collaborative skills in interdisciplinary learning environments. International Journal of Engineering Education, 31(1), 257–266.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gopal, R., Singh, V., & Aggarwal, A. (2021). Impact of online classes on the satisfaction and performance of students during the pandemic period of COVID-19. Education and Information Technologies, 26(6), 6923–6947.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gordon, C., et al. (2009). Foreword: Pedagogy, psychagogy, demagogy. In M. A. Peters (Ed.), Governmentality studies in education (pp. xi–xx). Sense Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gourlay, L. (2015). Open education as a ‘heterotopia of desire.’ Learning, Media and Technology., 40(3), 310–327.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gu, Q., Li, K., Jitpaiboon, T., & Smith, S. M. (2017). Teaching project management online versus face-to-face. Journal of Supply Chain and Operations Management, 15(3), 228–240.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gui, H. C., Wong, S. S. L., Ahmad Zaini, A., & Goh, N. A. (2021). Online learning amidst Covid-19 pandemic–explicating the nexus between learners’ characteristics, their learning environment and the learning outcomes in built environment studies. Interactive Learning Environments, 1–12.

    Google Scholar 

  • Izumi, T., Sukhwani, V., Surjan, A., & Shaw, R. (2021). Managing and responding to pandemics in higher educational institutions: Initial learning from COVID-19. International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 12(1), 51–66.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jarvis, D. S. (2014). Regulating higher education: Quality assurance and neo-liberal managerialism in higher education—A critical introduction. Policy and Society, 33(3), 155–166.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Klikauer, T. (2015). What is managerialism? Critical Sociology, 41(7–8), 1103–1119.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kornberger, M., & Carter, C. (2010). Manufacturing competition: How accounting practices shape strategy making in cities. Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, 23(3), 325–349.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Le Grange, L. (2020). Could the Covid-19 pandemic accelerate the uberfication of the university? South African Journal of Higher Education, 34(4), 1–10.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Li, T. M. (2007). Governmentality. Anthropologica, 49(2), 275–281.

    Google Scholar 

  • Liu, J., Wu, B., & Qu, J. (2022). Chinese adolescents’ struggle in online compulsory education during the COVID-19 pandemic: A Foucauldian perspective. Education and Information Technologies, 27(2), 1705.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Mercille, J., & Murphy, E. (2017). The neoliberalization of Irish higher education under austerity. Critical Sociology, 43(3), 371–387.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Morrissey, J. (2013). Governing the academic subject: Foucault, governmentality and the performing university. Oxford Review of Education, 39(6), 797–810.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Mueller, F., & Carter, C. (2007). ‘We are all managers now’: Managerialism and professional engineering in UK electricity utilities. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 32(1–2), 181–195.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Oliveira, G., Grenha Teixeira, J., Torres, A., & Morais, C. (2021). An exploratory study on the emergency remote education experience of higher education students and teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic. British Journal of Educational Technology, 52(4), 1357–1376.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Peters, M. A. (2013). Managerialism and the neoliberal university: Prospects for new forms of “open management” in higher education. Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice., 5(1), 11–26.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sandri, O., & Holdsworth, S. (2022). Pedagogies for sustainability: Insights from a foundational sustainability course in the built environment. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 23(3), 666–685.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Schuck, R. K., & Lambert, R. (2020). “Am I doing enough?” special educators’ experiences with emergency remote teaching in spring 2020. Education Sciences, 10, 320.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Shankar, K., Phelan, D., Suri, V. R., Watermeyer, R., Knight, C., & Crick, T. (2021). ‘The COVID-19 crisis is not the core problem’: Experiences, challenges, and concerns of Irish academia during the pandemic. Irish Educational Studies, 40(2), 169–175.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Shepherd, S. (2018). Managerialism: An ideal type. Studies in Higher Education., 43(9), 1668–1678.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Sriharan, A. (2020). Teaching online: Tips for engaging students in virtual classrooms. Medical Science Educator, 30(4), 1673–1675.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Stern, D. M. (2011). You had me at Foucault: Living pedagogically in the digital age. Text and Performance Quarterly, 31(3), 249–266.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Stewart, B., Speldewinde, P., & Ford, B. (2017). Influence of improved teaching practices on student satisfaction ratings for two undergraduate units at an Australian university. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 43(4), 598–611.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Teelken, C. (2012). Compliance or pragmatism: How do academics deal with managerialism in higher education? A comparative study in three countries. Studies in Higher Education, 37(3), 271–290.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Turnbull, D., Chugh, R., & Luck, J. (2021). Transitioning to e-learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: How have higher education institutions responded to the challenge? Education and Information Technologies, 26(5), 6401–6419.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Underwood, J. D. (2007). Rethinking the digital divide: Impacts on student-tutor relationships. European Journal of Education, 42(2), 213–222.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Vaz, P., & Bruno, F. (2003). Types of self-surveillance: From abnormality to individuals ‘at risk.’ Surveillance & Society, 1(3), 272–291.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Vican, S., Friedman, A., & Andreasen, R. (2020). Metrics, money, and managerialism: Faculty experiences of competing logics in higher education. The Journal of Higher Education, 91(1), 139–164.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Wong, P. S. P., Perera, T., Abbasnejad, B., & Ahankoob, A. (2021). Towards applying virtual reality techniques in fostering blended learning of the construction technology. In C. M. Wang, V. Dao, & S. Kitipornchai (Eds.), EASEC16 (pp. 2107–2117). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wu, W., & Hyatt, B. (2016). Experiential and project-based learning in BIM for sustainable living with Tiny Solar Houses. Procedia Engineering, 145(2), 579–586.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Zhang, J., Xie, H., Schmidt, K., Xia, B., Li, H., & Skitmore, M. (2019). Integrated experiential learning–based framework to facilitate project planning in civil engineering and construction management courses. Journal of Professional Issues in Engineering Education and Practice, 145(4), 05019005.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2023 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Osei-Nimo, S., Millman, C., Aboagye-Nimo, E. (2023). Power and Built Environment Course Delivery: A Modern Solution to Force Majeure. In: Nayak, B.S., Appleford, K. (eds) Beyond the Pandemic Pedagogy of Managerialism . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-40194-7_8

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-40194-7_8

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-031-40193-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-031-40194-7

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics