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haptic HONGI: Reflections on Collaboration in the Transdisciplinary Creation of an AR Artwork

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Creating Digitally

Part of the book series: Intelligent Systems Reference Library ((ISRL,volume 241))

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Abstract

This chapter explores the complexities of collaborative digital creation through haptic HONGI, an Augmented Reality (AR) project that is both transdisciplinary and intercultural in its conception. haptic HONGI aims to use contemporary digital technologies to bridge troubling intercultural relationships in Aotearoa New Zealand by creating a face-to-face tabletop encounter. The project both addresses the cultural divide between Māori and non- Māori in Aotearoa New Zealand, but also explores how the tension between artists and technologists can be overcome to create a transdisciplinary piece. In this chapter we describe the technology developed and reflect on lessons learned that could be useful for other teams creating transdisciplinary artwork using AR technologies.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    See https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/hololens/.

  2. 2.

    http://www.empathiccomputing.org/.

  3. 3.

    https://hci.auckland.ac.nz/2020/09/10/abi-and-cai-work-together-to-show-their-arty-science-side/.

  4. 4.

    Bleeding edge refers to a product or service that is new, experimental, generally untested, and carries a high degree of uncertainty. From https://www.investopedia.com/terms/b/bleeding-edge.asp Accessed 11th August 2022.

  5. 5.

    From https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/commensal Accessed 29th September 2021 The etymology of commensal... derives from the Latin prefix com-, meaning "with, together," jointly and the Latin adjective mensalis, meaning “of the table”.

  6. 6.

    From https://www.onthecommons.org/work/what-commoning-anyway accessed 2nd August 2022.

    The act of commoning draws on a network of relationships made under the expectation that we will each take care of one another and with a shared understanding that some things belong to all of us—which is the essence of the commons itself. The practice of commoning demonstrates a shift in thinking from the prevailing ethic of “you’re on your own” to “we’re in this together.

  7. 7.

    https://www.ars.nz/first-contact/.

  8. 8.

    https://www.ars.nz/haptic-hongi/.

  9. 9.

    https://www.ars.nz/haptic-hongi-2022/.

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Correspondence to Mairi Gunn .

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Gunn, M., Campbell, A., Billinghurst, M., Lawn, W., Sasikumar, P., Muthukumarana, S. (2023). haptic HONGI: Reflections on Collaboration in the Transdisciplinary Creation of an AR Artwork. In: Brooks, A.L. (eds) Creating Digitally. Intelligent Systems Reference Library, vol 241. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-31360-8_11

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