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Comprehensive Review on Wild Basil Genus Orthosiphon of Lamiaceae

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Bioprospecting of Tropical Medicinal Plants
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Abstract

There are millions of plants worldwide, yet most of them have not been investigated for their medicinal properties. The development and recognition of medicinal plants increase at an exponential rate in industrialized and developing nations, resulting in research works on medicinal plants congregating toward therapeutic needs. The remarkable diversity of both chemical structure and biological activities of naturally occurring secondary metabolites, the utility of novel bioactive natural compounds as biochemical probes, the development of novel and sensitive techniques to detect biologically active natural products paved way to improved approaches to isolate, purify, and structurally characterize these bioactive constituents, and advancement in solving the demand for supply of complex natural products.

The main focus of this review is to highlight the potential benefits of the Lamiaceae plant derived from multiple compounds and the importance of phytochemicals for the development of biocompatible therapeutics. In addition, this review focuses on problems encountered in medicinal plant research and discusses future directions. This review suggests that conservation strategies and resource management should be considered for sustainable utilization of medicinal plants. This review also recommends that the medicinal plant research should focus on tap plant components of Orthosiphon and deliver the most beneficial health products.

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Abirami, K., Revathi, P., Thenmozhi, K., Sowndhararajan, K. (2023). Comprehensive Review on Wild Basil Genus Orthosiphon of Lamiaceae. In: Arunachalam, K., Yang, X., Puthanpura Sasidharan, S. (eds) Bioprospecting of Tropical Medicinal Plants. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-28780-0_15

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