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Part of the book series: Practical Issues in Geriatrics ((PIG))

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Abstract

Hypertension, particularly systolic hypertension, is very prevalent in ageing societies. According to randomized controlled trials, treatment of hypertension is beneficial also for patients aged 75 years and older. However, benefits for those who are very old and frail, and especially with polypharmacy, are less certain because they have been largely excluded from trials. Accordingly, hypertensive patients who are healthy and functionally independent should be treated according to current recommendations and drugs irrespective of age. There is insufficient evidence regarding the benefits of hypertension treatment for frail, polymedicated older people. For them, treatment should be individualized.

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Correspondence to Timo E. Strandberg .

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Strandberg, T.E., Petrovic, M., Benetos, A. (2023). Hypertension. In: Cherubini, A., Mangoni, A.A., O’Mahony, D., Petrovic, M. (eds) Optimizing Pharmacotherapy in Older Patients. Practical Issues in Geriatrics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-28061-0_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-28061-0_18

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