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Societal Boundaries

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Handbook of the Anthropocene

Abstract

The notion of societal boundaries aims to enhance the debate on planetary boundaries. The focus is on capitalist societies as a heuristic for discussing the expansionary dynamics, power relations, and lock-ins of modern societies that impel highly unsustainable societal relations with nature. While formulating societal boundaries implies a controversial process – based on normative judgments, ethical concerns, and socio-political struggles – it has the potential to offer guidelines for a just, social-ecological transformation.

This book chapter is an excerpt of the full article Brand et al. (2021), available in open access. Contact: U Brand, University of Vienna, ulrich.brand@univie.ac.at

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Correspondence to Ulrich Brand .

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Brand, U. et al. (2023). Societal Boundaries. In: Wallenhorst, N., Wulf, C. (eds) Handbook of the Anthropocene. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-25910-4_267

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