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Electrocardiogram in Ischemic Heart Disease

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Ischemic Heart Disease
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Abstract

Ischemic process is defined as a reduction of blood supply to tissue, inducing metabolic and electrophysiologic cellular alterations. In this chapter, we discuss about the fundamental role of the ECG in ischemic heart disease. The electrocardiogram (ECG) allows a prompt diagnosis of myocardial ischemia or infarction, predicts the extent and locations of the involved area, and provides prognostic characterization in the advanced stage of disease. During ischemic process, ECG indicates disturbances of cardiac rhythm and conduction defects frequently found in the pathologic course.

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Correspondence to Andrea Rossi .

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Rossi, A. (2023). Electrocardiogram in Ischemic Heart Disease. In: Concistrè, G. (eds) Ischemic Heart Disease. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-25879-4_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-25879-4_10

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-031-25878-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-031-25879-4

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