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Abstract

Sapelli is a group of open-source applications, aimed to be used within a wider socio-technical approach which means that the software is expected to be used within a social process that considers inclusivity, equity, and risks and benefits. The software enables people with no or limited literacy as well as limited technical literacy to collect, share and analyze spatial data. Sapelli operates within the framework of an “Extreme Citizen Science” (ECS) methodology, based on co-creation and participatory design. This approach puts communities at the center of the project design process, enabling them to identify challenges they wish to address, what data to collect and how, and what analyses are required to address the challenges they have identified. The process relies on the consent and participation of participants, who shape the form and direction that the project takes.

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Acknowledgements

We owe a debt of gratitude to all the people and communities who gave us their time, insight, and understanding in the development of Sapelli. We also acknowledge the funding support that we have received from funders. The research on Sapelli was kindly supported by the UK’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (award EP/I025278/1) and the European Union’s ERC Advanced Grant project European Citizen Science: Analysis and Visualisation (under Grant Agreement No 694767); Additional support was kindly provided by Esri.

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Correspondence to Muki Haklay .

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Tarrant, M. et al. (2023). Sapelli. In: Burnett, C.M. (eds) Evaluating Participatory Mapping Software. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-19594-5_5

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