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mRNA Covid-19 Vaccines Best Reflect Effective Pharmaceuticals—Basic Considerations and LNPs

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Challenges and Opportunities of mRNA Vaccines Against SARS-CoV-2
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Abstract

When people think about Covid-19 jabs, they usually assume these are governed by the same principle as those known from childhood vaccines. Plainly, conventional vaccines: (1) are preparations that have been made in order to meet the host immune system at a certain site of encounter (injection site); (2) involve a certain amount and type of immunologic agents; and (3) result in stimulation of immune responses to turn on immunologic memory. Accordingly, conventional vaccines contain weakened/killed forms of the microorganism or an inactivated form of the toxin, usually complemented by some adjuvants. Importantly, the evoked immune response is to the injected material, i.e., to something that is limited and essentially fixed.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7107e2.htm.

  2. 2.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/articles/coronaviruscovid19/latestinsights, accessed March 30, 2022.

  3. 3.

    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/articles/coronaviruscovid19/latestinsights, https://coronavirus.data.gov.uk/.

  4. 4.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BXCcJMPqzdA.

  5. 5.

    For an English translation, see https://www.naturalnews.com/files/Pfizer-bio-distribution-confidential-document-translated-to-english.pdf.

  6. 6.

    http://www.cambridgeworkinggroup.org/.

  7. 7.

    https://www.nih.gov/about-nih/who-we-are/nih-director/statements/statement-funding-pause-certain-types-gain-function-research.

  8. 8.

    https://www.nih.gov/about-nih/who-we-are/nih-director/statements/nih-lifts-funding-pause-gain-function-research.

  9. 9.

    Unfortunately, the original link in the paper is not working. The paper likely refers to https://www.fda.gov/media/73679/download.

  10. 10.

    https://www.fda.gov/media/143557/download.

  11. 11.

    https://s29.q4cdn.com/745959723/files/doc_presentations/2021/12/FINAL-MASTER-Flu-Interim-Analysis-(12.10_6am).pdf.

  12. 12.

    See the EMA’s Assessment report on the COVID-19 Vaccine Moderna: https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/assessment-report/spikevax-previously-covid-19-vaccine-moderna-epar-public-assessment-report_en.pdf. This link no longer seems to exist, but the document can still be found on Wayback Machine: https://web.archive.org/web/20220128175802/https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/assessment-report/spikevax-previously-covid-19-vaccine-moderna-epar-public-assessment-report_en.pdf.

  13. 13.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SghEQ-qH1cc.

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Mueller, S. (2023). mRNA Covid-19 Vaccines Best Reflect Effective Pharmaceuticals—Basic Considerations and LNPs. In: Challenges and Opportunities of mRNA Vaccines Against SARS-CoV-2. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-18903-6_9

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