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Creative Continuation: An Alternative Perspective on Innovation and Society

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Debating Innovation

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Abstract

Innovation has during the last decades become a buzzword in academia as well as in politics and business. The contemporary imperative is almost: innovate or perish. This also seems to be valid for all levels of social organization. In our Western tradition we tend to cherish deep changes, those that make us take the big step forward. In this chapter, I start from the literature on the dark side of innovations, picking up the analyses of how societies often tend to deteriorate institutionally and economically in the wake of radical changes, to lift forward the concept of creative continuation. This concept should be a key to the understanding of how societies can grow and thrive by putting to use their own immanent resources for economic and institutional development. Snapshots of three cases having succeeded by doing it “their way” are used to illustrate the argument.

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Correspondence to Jon P. Knudsen .

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Knudsen, J.P. (2023). Creative Continuation: An Alternative Perspective on Innovation and Society. In: Rehn, A., Örtenblad, A. (eds) Debating Innovation. Palgrave Debates in Business and Management. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-16666-2_4

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