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Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders and Dissociative Disorders

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Abstract

Trauma- and stressor-related disorders and dissociative disorders are distinct diagnostic classes of disorders with symptoms that can severely impair one’s ability to function, particularly in a social environment. In the case of the former, a traumatic event or stressor antecedes the symptoms, and symptomology is defined by a combination of avoidant behavior, hypervigilance, negative mood, re-experiencing of the trauma, and dissociative experiences such as amnesia, depersonalization/derealization, and flashbacks (one of the most common symptoms associated with the trauma- and stressor-related disorder posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In extreme cases, individuals may also report difficulties regulating emotion, a diminished sense of self, and severe interpersonal problems. For the latter, trauma is not necessarily an antecedent of the disorder, but some form of trauma is common. Dissociative symptoms are characterized by a discontinuity in normal cognitive functioning that may affect memory, identity, behavior, emotion, or even one’s sense of proprioception (as in depersonalization or derealization disorder).

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Ahmad, S. (2023). Trauma- and Stressor-Related Disorders and Dissociative Disorders. In: IsHak, W.W. (eds) Atlas of Psychiatry. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-15401-0_19

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