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Ethics and Machine Translation: The End User Perspective

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Part of the Machine Translation: Technologies and Applications book series (MATRA,volume 4)

Abstract

This chapter analyses existing research on the ethical implications of using MT in translation and communication, and it describes results from usability experiments that focus on the inclusion of raw and post-edited MT in multilingual products and creative texts with an emphasis on users’ feedback. It also offers suggestions on how MT content should be presented to users, readers, and consumers in general. It finally considers the ethical responsibility of all stakeholders in this new digital reality. If the ethical dimension is an ecosystem, users also have the responsibility to support products that protect language, translators, and future generations.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    See also Paullada (2020) on MT and power dynamics.

  2. 2.

    Richting was the MT alternative instead of Rechts (right in German).

  3. 3.

    Correcto was the MT alternative instead of Derecha because Right can have several translations, one meaning right-hand side and another one meaning correct.

  4. 4.

    The participant is referring here to the indentation where the MT proposal meant correct in Spanish instead of right. He understands left (Izquierdo) but then he sees correct (Correcto) instead of right (Derecho/a).

  5. 5.

    The translations from Catalan into English are provided by the authors.

  6. 6.

    Our ethics committees agreed that these were low-risk settings for use of MT, but in a high-risk setting this should change. At what level of risk does a study using MT without informing participants become research involving deception?

  7. 7.

    The authors offered a detailed description of copyright laws, translation and how AI might be infringing these international laws that protect authors and creators, and they suggest including work generated by AI systems.

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Guerberof-Arenas, A., Moorkens, J. (2023). Ethics and Machine Translation: The End User Perspective. In: Moniz, H., Parra Escartín, C. (eds) Towards Responsible Machine Translation. Machine Translation: Technologies and Applications, vol 4. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-14689-3_7

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