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Cross-Neurotype Communication Competence

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Abstract

Historically, neurological minorities have been pressured to change their communication to accommodate neurotypical norms and stigmatized when they do not meet socially constructed expectations. In contrast, the following theoretical discussion of cross-neurotype communication competence centers neurological differences. The chapter highlights four categories as socially significant in neuro-shared spaces, for navigating cross-neurotype interactions. They include interest systems (how one engages with others and their interests), sensory sensitivity (how people experience a range of visual/tactile/olfactory/auditory stimuli in a given environment), affect display (the value placed on the production and reception of nonverbal cues), and social interaction (one’s structural preferences for interacting with others).

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Stones, E. (2023). Cross-Neurotype Communication Competence. In: Jeffress, M.S., Cypher, J.M., Ferris, J., Scott-Pollock, JA. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Disability and Communication. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-14447-9_4

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