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Complex Learning Environments: Tensions in Student Perspectives that Indicate Competing Values

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS,volume 13356)

Abstract

Advances in software have enabled an increase in the complexity of online learning environments (OLE). How students perceive learning when these environments are more complex is not yet understood. We conducted a focus group with students who were taking a pilot-training course to understand their experiences with a complex OLE. This online course integrated Moodle, a virtual world, and a simulator among other technologies to facilitate student learning. Student perceptions and experiences highlight tensions that indicate nuanced concerns about the learning environment. Many of these concerns are similar to those previously identified. Student concerns over features like leader boards suggest a need for updating online-learning theories to explicitly address issues around data privacy and information sharing.

Keywords

  • Online learning
  • Virtual worlds
  • Pilot training
  • Simulation

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Acknowledgements

This work received financial support from Mitacs and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), [RGPIN-2018-03834].

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Correspondence to Minghao Cai .

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Cai, M., Demmans Epp, C., Firoozi, T. (2022). Complex Learning Environments: Tensions in Student Perspectives that Indicate Competing Values. In: Rodrigo, M.M., Matsuda, N., Cristea, A.I., Dimitrova, V. (eds) Artificial Intelligence in Education. Posters and Late Breaking Results, Workshops and Tutorials, Industry and Innovation Tracks, Practitioners’ and Doctoral Consortium. AIED 2022. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 13356. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-11647-6_25

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-11647-6_25

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