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Statistics and Intelligence: A Chequered Relationship

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Abstract

This chapter examines the changing relationship between ‘statistics and intelligence’. It shows how statistics and intelligence influence each other. On the one hand, statistical methods are needed to measure the phenomenon of intelligence. On the other hand, the development of such methods on the part of mathematicians or stochastics requires cleverness, intellect and astuteness. This chapter also shows the power inherent in data, and the challenges faced by statisticians and subject representatives (who initiate and conduct studies) to uncover the information content hidden therein, to interpret the results of data analysis adequately, and to implement them consistently.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-031-04198-3_13
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Fig. 13.1
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Correspondence to Christel Weiss .

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Weiss, C. (2022). Statistics and Intelligence: A Chequered Relationship. In: Holm-Hadulla, R.M., Funke, J., Wink, M. (eds) Intelligence - Theories and Applications. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-04198-3_13

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