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Postcolonial Modernity and Literary Imagination

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Nigerian Literary Imagination and the Nationhood Project

Part of the book series: African Histories and Modernities ((AHAM))

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Abstract

This chapter examines understandings of modernity rooted in colonialism and ideas of the West. It then explores the counternarrative to colonialism—postcolonialism—and how literary writers from formerly colonized regions give a voice to the formerly subjugated peoples who still feel the weight of the flawed Western vision and its oppressive forces. In particular, postcolonial writers from Africa, as well as their methods and themes, are discussed.

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Notes

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Correspondence to Toyin Falola .

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Falola, T. (2022). Postcolonial Modernity and Literary Imagination. In: Nigerian Literary Imagination and the Nationhood Project. African Histories and Modernities. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-031-01991-3_5

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