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College Students’ Credibility Judgments on Healthy Diet Information on Social Media

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Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS,volume 1533)

Abstract

The main objective of this study was to investigate how college students judge the credibility of healthy diet information on social media. This mixed-method two-phase sequential study used a survey and individual interview methods to explore how college students judge the credibility of the acquired information, and how their healthy diet behaviour and nutrition literacy are related to the credibility judgment criteria they use. Results show that students value expertise of authors on social media higher than friendliness, but the importance of motivating and friendly interaction is more indicative of students’ information use behaviour. Students who exhibit healthy diet behaviour give more value to authors’ expertise. Students who have problems in understanding nutrition information rely more on the friendliness and popularity of authors on social media as credibility indicators.

Keywords

  • Credibility judgements
  • Healthy diet information
  • Social media
  • Nutrition literacy
  • College students
  • Adolescents

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-99885-1_6
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Kolarić, A., Juric, M., Peša Pavlović, N. (2022). College Students’ Credibility Judgments on Healthy Diet Information on Social Media. In: Kurbanoğlu, S., Špiranec, S., Ünal, Y., Boustany, J., Kos, D. (eds) Information Literacy in a Post-Truth Era. ECIL 2021. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1533. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99885-1_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99885-1_6

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