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Hookworms in South America: A Constant Threat Especially to Children

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Infectious Tropical Diseases and One Health in Latin America

Part of the book series: Parasitology Research Monographs ((Parasitology Res. Monogr.,volume 16))

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Abstract

Hookworms (= bloodsucking nematodes) belong to the group of the most common and extremely dangerous worms worldwide. They attack humans as well as animals, especially in so-called developing countries in warm climates as in South America. Especially people living in regions with a low-graded health system are still today highly endangered and suffer from large numbers of death cases ranging from young kids to old persons.

The present chapter gives insights into the life cycle of these worms, their morphology, their life cycle, prevention methods, and treatment changes in times of progressing drug resistances. Thus it is time to ameliorate the hygienic systems in these countries by the help of the One Health program and by information targeted to a broad spectrum of endangered people how to avoid infections.

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Correspondence to Heinz Mehlhorn .

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Mehlhorn, H. (2022). Hookworms in South America: A Constant Threat Especially to Children. In: Mehlhorn, H., Heukelbach, J. (eds) Infectious Tropical Diseases and One Health in Latin America. Parasitology Research Monographs, vol 16. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99712-0_11

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