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Part of the book series: Palgrave Studies in International Relations ((PSIR))

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Abstract

This chapter outlines the context, argument, contribution and structure of the book. It situates the book in the debate on ‘camp’ formation in IR, with the aim to problematise the debate and set the stage for a nuanced reading of classical realism. The argument is set in four stages, starting with the presentation of a nuanced account of classical realism that is presently overlooked by post-colonial IR scholars. In turn the argument moves to highlight a common ground between Carr and the first wave of post-colonial thinkers on imperialism and war. Third, the book compares and critiques the idealism of Carr and the first wave of post-colonial thinkers’ visions of the post-war settlement. Finally, the book argues that Carr’s work opens avenues for engagement between classical realism and post-colonialism and draws lessons from this engagement. Overall, in presenting these arguments, the book contributes to two sets of scholarship in IR. First, it contributes to the scholarship published on Carr’s contribution to IR theory in the past thirty years, by showing that Carr was much closer to post-colonial thinkers than previously appreciated in the discipline. Second, the book contributes to the scholarship on Carr’s thoughts on nationalism, through, on one hand, highlighting a neglected psycho-social dimension in his analysis of nationalism, and, on the other, revealing the relevance of this dimension to post-colonial IR today.

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Correspondence to Haro L Karkour .

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Karkour, H.L. (2022). Introduction. In: E. H. Carr: Imperialism, War and Lessons for Post-Colonial IR. Palgrave Studies in International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-99360-3_1

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