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SortOut: Persuasive Stress Management Mobile Application for Higher Education Students

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Persuasive Technology (PERSUASIVE 2022)
  • The original version of this chapter was revised: figures have been updated to a higher resolution and errors in Figs. 8 and 9 were corrected. Correction to this chapter is available at https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-98438-0_21

Abstract

Mental stress is a serious emerging health issue among higher education students. Time management is often promoted for students as an effective strategy to cope with stress. However, previous research indicated that promoting students’ perceived ability to control their times can directly reduce their stress. Based on the results of a large-scale study involving 502 participants, we identified that the ability to be organized is the most effective time management behaviour that promotes students’ perceptions about their ability to control their times, reduce stress, hence, anxiety. We applied these results to design a mobile app intervention (called SortOut), which includes seven persuasive strategies implemented as six-core features. SortOut app aims to help students manage their stress and anxiety by promoting time management via preference for organization and control over time. We evaluated SortOut app on 68 participants, considering possible differences based on gender and degree level. Overall, the results revealed the app was perceived as strongly persuasive and had high motivational appeal. Yet, the app design provoked and sustained females’ attention more than males. Usability evaluation shows the app is useful and easy to use, hence more likely to be accepted and used. Finally, we conducted a thematic analysis on the participants’ feedback and suggestions that will be used to refine the app design.

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Change history

  • 21 March 2022

    In an older version of this paper, all figures were erroneously published with low resolution versions of the original images, and figures 8 and 9 were incorrect. These issues have been corrected.

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Acknowledgement

This research was undertaken, in part, thanks to funding from the Canada Research Chairs Program. We acknowledge the support of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) through the Discovery Grant.

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Correspondence to Mona Alhasani .

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Alhasani, M., Orji, R. (2022). SortOut: Persuasive Stress Management Mobile Application for Higher Education Students. In: Baghaei, N., Vassileva, J., Ali, R., Oyibo, K. (eds) Persuasive Technology. PERSUASIVE 2022. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 13213. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-98438-0_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-98438-0_2

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