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Poetry Workshops

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Abstract

In this Chapter, I present a detailed explanation of how to develop, deliver, and evolve poetry workshops. I also discuss why these poetry workshops are an effective format for developing dialogues between scientific and non-scientific audiences, and how they can be used to level hierarchies of intellect.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-96829-8_6
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Correspondence to Sam Illingworth .

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Illingworth, S. (2022). Poetry Workshops. In: Science Communication Through Poetry. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-96829-8_6

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