Skip to main content

Oil Production, Dispossession, and Community Development in Africa: A Development Education Perspective

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
Reimagining Development Education in Africa

Abstract

There is growing evidence that the impacts of oil and gas extraction on vulnerability are real and accelerating. Coupled with a host of interrelated livelihood sustainability questions, this has fueled interdisciplinary research on improving livelihoods to vulnerability, as well as to better understand the mechanisms of natural resources exploitation and policy options to limit the socio-cultural and environmental damages to natural resource extraction. Increasingly, development education, community education, and alternative livelihood sources are being leveraged by researchers when analyzing these problems. There is, however, limited discourse regarding the possible synergies that could result from improved engagement between those interested in natural resource extraction on one hand, and community members and researchers on the other hand in tackling resource extraction issues. In this chapter, we employ the accumulation by dispossession discourse espoused by David Harvey that focuses on the prospects for making new contributions to the growing literature on natural resource exploitation and vulnerability. We identify three critical issues that offer significant opportunities for collaborative studies on the nexus between natural resource extraction and development education: (1) the problem of oil exploitation and vulnerability, (2) questions of new alternative livelihood and transition, (3) development/community education and livelihood opportunities approach. Our analysis suggests that issues of development agenda/plan, decentralization of windfall revenues, sector analysis on policies and programs and other development education initiatives underpin these natural resource extraction research needs. This chapter is intended to foster new dialogue between oil exploitation and development education.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or Ebook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 99.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 129.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 129.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Ackah-Baidoo, A. (2016). Youth unemeployment in resource-rich Sub-Saharan African. A critical review. Extractive Industries & Societies, 3, 249–261.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Ackah-Baidoo, A. (2013). Fishing in troubled waters: Oil production community-level grievances in the Western Region of Ghana. Community Development Journal, 48(3), 406–420. https://doi.org/10.1093/cdj/bst022

  • Adepoju, A. (2008). Migration and social policy in sub-Saharan Africa. UNRISD, IOM and IFS. http://tinyurl.com/adepoju-2008-migration-social

  • Akram-Lodhi, A. H. (2007). Land, markets and neoliberal enclosure: An agrarian political economy perspective. Third World Quarterly, 28(8), 1437–1456.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Allen, J. (2004). The whereabouts of power: Politics, government and space. Geografiska Annaler: Series B. Human Geography, 86, 19–32.

    Google Scholar 

  • Allen, J. (2011). Topological twists: Power’s shifting geographies. Dialogue in Human Geography, 1, 283–298.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Ansell, A., Froerer, N., Huijsmans, P., Dungey, R., Dost, C. E., & Piti, A. C. (2020). Educating ‘surplus population’: Uses and abuses of aspiration in the rural peripheries of a globalising world. Fennia, 198(1–2), 17–38. https://doi.org/10.11143/fennia.90756

  • Auty, R. M. (2001). The political economy of resource-driven growth. European Economic Review, 45, 839–846.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Auty, R. M. (1997). Natural resources, the state and development strategy. Journal of International Development, 9, 651–663.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Auty, R. M. (1993). Sustaining development in mineral economies: The resource curse thesis. Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barry, J. (2012). Standing our ground: Women, environmental justice, and the fight to end mountaintop removal. Ohio University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Beauchemin, C. (2011). Rural-urban migration in West Africa: Towards a reversal? Migration trends and economic situation in Burkina Faso and Côte d’Ivoire. Population, Space and Place, 17(1), 47–72.

    Google Scholar 

  • Benjaminsen, A. T., & Bryceson, I. (2012). Conservation, green/blue grabbing and accumulation by dispossession in Tanzania. The Journal of Peasant Studies, 39(2), 335–355.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Biney, I. K. (2021). Continuing education and employment creation: Investment in entrepreneurship matters. Community Development. https://doi.org/10.1080/15575330.2021.1874453

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Blair, H. (2000). Participation and accountability at the periphery: Democratic local governance in six countries. World Development, 28(1), 21–39. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0305-750X(99)00109-6

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Boone, C., & Moyo, S. (2012). The politics of land in contemporary Africa. London School of Economics and Political Science Africa Talks Public Lecture, 12 November. www.lse.ac.uk/publicEvents/events/2012/11/20121112t1800vU8.aspx (Accessed October 30, 2021.)

  • Bourn, D. (2008). Development education: Towards a re-conceptualisation. International Journal of Development Education & Global Learning, 1(1), 5–22.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Brenner, N., Peck, J., & Theordore, N. (2010). After neoliberalisation? Globalization, 7, 327–345.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Briggs, X. de S. (2007). Rethinking community development: Managing dilemmas about goals and values. Working Smarter in Community Development Knowledge-in-Action Brief 07–1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brown, P., Lauder, H., & Ashton, D. (2012). The global auction: The broken promises of education, jobs, and incomes. Socio-Economic Review, 10(4), 779–793. https://doi.org/10.1093/ser/mws005

  • Bruckner, M. (2010). Natural resource dependence, non-tradables, and economic growth. Journal of Comparative Economics, 38, 461–471.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bumpus, A. G., & Liverman, D. M. (2008). Accumulation by decarbonisation and the governance of carbon offsets. Economic Geography, 84, 127–155.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Coghlan, A. (2014). Africa’s Eden faces threat of oil drillers. New Scientist, 222(2970), 12–12.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Collier, P. (2010). The plundered planet: Why we must-and how we can- manage nature for global prosperity. Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • CSDH. (2008). Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Final report of the Commission on Social Determinants of Health. World Health Organisation.

    Google Scholar 

  • Das, R. (2017). David Harvey’s theory of accumulation by dispossession: A Marxist critique. World Review of Political Economy, 8(4), 590–616.

    Google Scholar 

  • DeJaeghere, J., & Baxter, A. (2014). Entrepreneurship education for youth in sub-Saharan Africa: A capabilities approach as an alternative framework to neoliberalism’s individualizing risks. Progress in Development Studies, 14(1), 61–76.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Dooling, S., & Simon, G. (Eds.). (2012). Cities, nature, development: The politics and production of urban vulnerabilities. Ashgate.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dyson, J. (2019). Rethinking education as a contradictory resource: Girls’ education in the Indian Himalayas. Geoforum, 103, 66‒74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2019.03.021

  • Findlay, A. M. (2005). Editorial: Vulnerable spatialities. Population, Space & Place, 11, 429–439.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Fisher, S. L., & Smith, B. E. (Eds.). (2012). Transforming places: Lessons from appalachia. University of Illinois Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gary, I. & Karl, T. L. (2003). Bottom of the barrel: Africa’s oil boom and the poor. Catholic Relief Services, 1–102.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gasperini, L., & Acker, D. (2009). The role of education, training and capacity development in poverty reduction and food security. Food and Agriculture Organization of United Nations. http://www.fao.org/3/a-i0760e.pdf

  • Gelb, A. H. (1988). Windfall gains: Blessing or curse? Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ghazvinian, J. (2007). Untapped; The scramble for Africa’s oil. Harcourt Inc.

    Google Scholar 

  • Glassman, J. (2009). The ongoing (ir) relevance of primitive accumulation. Human Geography, 2, 94–97.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gylfason, T. (2000). Natural resources, education and economic development. 15th Annual Congress of the European Economic Association, Bolzano, August–September 2000.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gylfason, T., Herbertsson, T. T., & Zoega, G. (1999). A mixed blessing: Natural resources and economic growth. Macroeconomic Dynamics, 3, 204–225.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hall, D. (2013). Primitive accumulation, accumulation by dispossession and the global land grab. Third World Quarterly, 34(9), 1582–1604.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Harrison, R. (2006). Learning and development. Human Resource Management International Digest, 14(4), 12‒26. https://doi.org/10.1108/hrmid.2006.04414dae.001

  • Harvey, D. (2003). The new imperialism. Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Huckle, J., & Wals, E. J. A. (2015). The UN decade of education for sustainable development: Business as usual in the end. Environmental Education Research, 21(3), 491–505. https://doi.org/10.1080/13504622.2015.1011084, https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273599789_The_UN_Decade_of_Education_for_Sustainable_Development_Business_as_Usual_in_the_End [Accessed April 14, 2021].

  • ISODEC. (2014). Oil and gas our last frontier for economic and structural transformation. Ghana Oil and Gas Economic Impact Report 2014. ISODEC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kark, S., Brokovich, E., Mazor, T., & Levin, N. (2015). Emerging conservation challenges and prospects in an era of offshore hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation. Conservation Biology, 29(6), 1573–1585.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kanyenze, G., & Kondo, T. (Eds.). (2011). Beyond the enclave. Towards a pro-poor and inclusive development strategy for Zimbabwe. Weaver Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Katz, C. (2011). Accumulation, excess, childhood: Toward a countertopography of risk and waste. Documents D’anàlisi Geogràfica, 57(1), 47–60.

    Google Scholar 

  • Levien, M. (2013). Regimes of dispossession: From steel towns to Special Economic Zones. Development & Change, 44, 381–407.

    Google Scholar 

  • Levien, M. (2015). From primitive accumulation to regimes of dispossession: Six theses on India’s land question. Economic & Political Weekly, 22, 146–157.

    Google Scholar 

  • Li, T. M. (2017). After development: Surplus population and the politics of entitlement. Development & Change, 48(6), 1247–1261. https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12344

  • Luxemburg, R. (2003). The accumulation of capital. Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Martinez, M. O., Napolitano, D. A., MacLennan, G. J., Callaghan, C. O., Ciborowski, S., & Fabregas, X. (2007). Impacts of petroleum activities for the Achuar people of the Peruvian Amazon: Summary of existing evidence and research gaps. Environmental Research Letters, 2(4), 1–10.

    Google Scholar 

  • Martinez-Alier, J. (2002). The environmentalism of the poor: A study of ecological conflicts and valuation. Edward Elgar.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Marx, K. 1976 [1867]. Capital. Penguin.

    Google Scholar 

  • McKeown, R., Hopkins, C. A., Rizzi, R., & Chrystalbridge, M. (2002). Education for sustainable development toolkit. University of Tennessee. Retrieved December 23, 2020.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mehlum, H., Moene, K., & Torvik, R. (2006). Institutions and the resource curse. The Economic Journal, 116, 1–20.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Meli, J. (2019). Foreword: In Oil in 3D: The demand outlook to 2050. Barclays Bank.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mukherji, A. (2019). Marxian economics: Notes from a neo-classical viewpoint. Arthaniti: Journal of Economic Theory & Practice, 18, 1–16.

    Google Scholar 

  • Murombedzi, C. J. (2016). Inequality and natural resources in Africa. World Social Science Report: UNESCO and the ISSC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Murphy, K. (Ed.) (2014). Development education in adult and community settings: Guidelines for good practice. IDEA Community Sector Working Group.

    Google Scholar 

  • Muttarak, R., & Hitz, W. (2014). Is education a key to reducing vulnerability to natural disasters and hence unavoidable climate change? Ecology & Society, 19(1), 42.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Naudé, W. (2012). Entrepreneurship and economic development: Theory, evidence and policy. Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Obeng-Odoom, F. (2015). Oil boom, human capital and economic development. Some recent evidence. Economic Labour Relation Review, 1–17.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Flaherty, J., & Liddy, M. (2018). The impact of development education and education for sustainability interventions: A synthesis of the research. Environmental Education Research, 24(7), 1031–1049.

    Google Scholar 

  • Okoh, R. N. (2006). Nigeria non-oil export products mix and the comparative global market place. Delta State University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Oliveira, R. (2007). Oil and politics in the Gulf of Guinea. Hurst and Company Publishers Ltd.

    Google Scholar 

  • OPEC Fund. (2019). Africa: A bright future? OFID Quarterly, October, 2018.

    Google Scholar 

  • Prudham, S. (2007). The fictions of autonomous invention: Accumulation by dispossession, commodification and life patents in Canada. Antipode, 39, 406–429.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Roberts, W. C. (2017). Marx’s inferno: The political theory of capital. Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ross, M. L. (2012). The oil curse: How petroleum wealth shapes the development of nations. Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ross, M., Lujala, P., & Rustad, S. A. (2012). Horizontal inequality, decentralizing the distribution of natural resource revenues, and peace. In E. P. Lujala & S. A. Rustad (Ed.), High-Value Natural Resources and Peacebuilding (pp. 251–259), Earthscan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ross, M. L. (2003). Nigeria’s oil sector and the poor. UK Department for International Development “Nigeria: Drivers of change” program. Rose 2003 nigeria oil sector and the poor.pdf

    Google Scholar 

  • Ryan, J. (2013). Livelihoods and economic recovery in crisis situations. Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery, UNDP.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sachs, J. D., & Warner, A. M. (2001). Natural resources and economic development the curse of natural resources. European Economic Review, 45, 827–838.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Sachs, J. D., & Warner, A. M. (1999). The big push, natural resource booms and growth. Journal of Development Economics, 59, 43–76.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Sachs, J. D., & Warner, A. M. (1997). Sources of slow growth in African economies. Journal of African Economies, 6(3), 335–376.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Siakwah, P. (2018). Actors, networks, and globalised assemblages: Rethinking oil, the environment and conflict in Ghana. Energy Research & Social Science, 38, 68–76. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.erss.2018.01.021

  • Siakwah, P. (2017). Actor network theory, globalised assemblages and the impact of oil on agriculture and industry in Ghana. Extractive Industries and Society, 4, 462–472. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exis.2017.04.007

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Simon, G. L., & Dooling, S. (2013). Flame and fortune in California: The material and political dimensions of vulnerability. Global Environmental Change, 23, 1410–1423.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Smith, E. B. (2015). Another place is possible? Labour geography, spatial dispossession, and gendered resistance in Central. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 105(3), 567–582.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Steel, G., & van Lindert, P. (2017). Rural livelihood transformations and local development in Cameroon, Ghana and Tanzania. IIED. http://pubs.iied.org/10811IIED. Accessed January 25, 2021.

  • Stevens, P. (2003). Resource impact: Curse or blessing? A literature survey. Journal of Energy Literature, 9(1), 3–42.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stinson, J. (2014). Mother nature’s best kept secret? Exploring the discursive terrain and lived experience of the ecotourism-extraction nexus in Southern Belize. In B. Buscher & V. Davidov (Eds.), The ecotourism-extraction nexus: Political economies and rural realites of (un)comfortable bedfellows (pp. 88–109). Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swamy, R. (2018). Fishers, vulnerability, and the political economy of dispossession and reconstruction in post-tsunami Tamil Nadu. Individual and social adaptations to human vulnerability. Research in Economic Anthropology, 38, 103–126.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Tabb, W. K. (2012). The restructuring of capitalism in our time. Columbia University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Ugochukwu, C. N., & Ertel, J. (2008). Negative impacts of oil exploration on biodiversity management in the Niger Delta area of Nigeria. Impact Assessment & Project Appraisal, 26(2), 139–147.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNDP. (2019). Beyond income. Beyond averages. Beyond today: Inequalities in human development in the 21st Century. UNDP. Accessed January 15, 2021. http://hdrundp.org/sites/default/files/hdr2019.pdf

  • UNDP. (2011). Managing natural resources for human development in low-income countries. WP 2011–002, December 2011, Regional Office for Africa.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNDP. (2004). Reducing disaster risk a challenge for development, a Global report. Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery. UNDP.

    Google Scholar 

  • UNESCO. (2008). EFA Global monitoring report 2009. Overcoming inequality. Why government matters, UNESCO.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vasquez, I. P. (2016). Four policy actions to improve local governance of the oil and gas sector. International Development Policy, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.4000/poldev.2227

  • Watts, M. (2003). Economies of violence: More oil, more blood. Economic and Political Weekly, 38(48), 5089–5099.

    Google Scholar 

  • WCESD. (2009). UNESCO World conference for sustainable development. Bonn.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wright, G. (2003). ‘Wolfowitz: Iraq War was About Oil’. Guardian, June 4, 2003.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Boadi Agyekum .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Agyekum, B., Siakwah, P., Biney, I.K. (2022). Oil Production, Dispossession, and Community Development in Africa: A Development Education Perspective. In: Frimpong Kwapong, O.A.T., Addae, D., Boateng, J.K. (eds) Reimagining Development Education in Africa. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-96001-8_10

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-96001-8_10

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-96000-1

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-96001-8

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics