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Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy

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Part of the Updates in Hypertension and Cardiovascular Protection book series (UHCP)

Abstract

Hypertension in pregnancy is empirically diagnosed when there is sustained systolic (SBP) of ≥140 mmHg, or a sustained diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg obtained through a standardized technique of measurement using auscultatory (mercury or aneroid devices) or automated methods. An elevated measurement whether systolic or diastolic must be confirmed on repeat measurement before the woman can be considered hypertensive to reduce the potential for misdiagnosis based on spurious reading or the patient’s anxiousness during the measurement.

It has been observed that low to middle income countries (LMICs) bear a disproportionate burden of maternal morbidity and mortality from the various hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. The provision of good quality antenatal care during the first 4 months of pregnancy based on WHO recommendations is an effective intervention that can reduce maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity from hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Keywords

  • Hypertension in pregnancy
  • Preeclampsia
  • Eclampsia
  • Gestational hypertension

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Fig. 18.1

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Correspondence to Deborah Ignacia D. Ona .

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Santos, M.I., Madrigal-Dy, C., Ona, D.I.D. (2022). Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy. In: Ram, C.V.S., Teo, B.W.J., Wander, G.S. (eds) Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease in Asia. Updates in Hypertension and Cardiovascular Protection. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-95734-6_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-95734-6_18

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