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Big Data Medicine

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Abstract

Every minute of the day, approximately 3 petabytes (in bytes, that would be a number with 15 zeros!) of internet data are generated. Considering the exposome, many of them can be declared as health-related data in a narrower or broader sense. Only computers provide a solution for the analysis of these gigantic amounts of data for the purpose of individual diagnoses.

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Schmidt, H.H.H.W. (2022). Big Data Medicine. In: The end of medicine as we know it - and why your health has a future. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-95293-8_16

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