Skip to main content

Laying the Foundation for Wellbeing in Youth in New Zealand: Developing Socio-Emotional Understandings in Students, Families, and Teachers Through a Co-constructed Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining Framework

  • 152 Accesses

Part of the Transdisciplinary Perspectives in Educational Research book series (TPER,volume 4)

Abstract

In this chapter, we consider how a collaborative research project between a university and two schools is contributing to global dialogue around socio-emotional wellbeing in schools, through the development of a coconstructed culturally and linguistically sustaining socio-emotional learning framework that is responsive to the New Zealand context. This research acknowledges the centrality of te reo Māori (Māori language), and the status of Māori as tāngata whenua (indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand). The use of te reo Māori within the project, and our descriptions of our work, aligns with te Tiriti o Waitangi (Māori version of the Treaty of Waitangi) and is an expected, and accepted discourse practice within educational contexts in New Zealand. At times, we forefront te reo Māori to acknowledge knowledge generated by, for, and with a Māori worldview to reflect this positionality. In this chapter we describe how we engaged with teachers and extended family groups to gather their culturally grounded views on social emotional wellbeing. We examine how this collaborative relationship has enabled teachers to draw upon these co-constructed understandings to develop pedagogical practices to promote the social emotional wellbeing of students. We conclude with reflections that can inform other international contexts.

Keywords

  • Socio-emotional wellbeing
  • Cultural and linguistic responsiveness
  • Pedagogical actions
  • Children
  • Indigenous cultures

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-95205-1_8
  • Chapter length: 13 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-95205-1
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 8.1
Fig. 8.2
Fig. 8.3

Notes

  1. 1.

    In upholding the principles of our research, local indigenous iwi (tribal groups) and hapū (sub-tribal groups) were also included in the research process.

References

  • Bailey, R., Stickle, L., Brion-Meisels, G., & Jones, S. (2019). Re-imagining social-emotional learning: Findings from a strategy-based approach. Phi Delta Kappan, 100(5), 53–58.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barry, M. M., Clarke, A. M., & Dowling, K. (2017). Promoting social and emotional wellbeing in schools. Health Education, 117(5), 434–451.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Berkel, C., Mauricio, A. M., Schoenfelder, E., & Sandler, I. N. (2011). Putting the pieces together: An integrated model of program implementation. Prevention Science, 12(1), 23–33.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bowles, T., Jimerson, S., Haddock, A., Nolan, J., Jablonski, S., Czub, M., & Coelho, V. (2017). A review of the provision of social and emotional learning in Australia, the United States, Poland, and Portugal. Journal of Relationships Research, 8, 1–13.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Charmaz, K. (2011). Grounded theory methods in social justice research. In N. K. Denzin & Y. S. Lincoln (Eds.), The sage handbook of qualitative research (4th ed.). Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Corcoran, R., Cheung, A., Kim, E., & Chen, X. (2018). Effective universal school-based social and emotional learning programs for improving academic achievement: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 50 years of research. Educational Research Review, 25, 56–72.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Durie, M. (1998). Whaiora: Maori health development. Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Durlak, J. A., Weissberg, R. P., Dymnicki, A. B., Taylor, R. D., & Schellinger, K. B. (2011). The impact of enhancing students’ social and emotional learning: A meta-analysis of school-based universal interventions. Child Development, 82(1), 405–432.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Education Council. (2017). Our Code Our Standards. https://teachingcouncil.nz/content/our-code-our-standards

  • Education Review Office. (2015a). A wellbeing for success resource for primary schools. http://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/wellbeing-for-childrens-success-at-primary-school/

  • Education Review Office. (2015b). A wellbeing for success resource for secondary schools. https://www.ero.govt.nz/publications/wellbeing-for-young-peoples-success-at-secondary-school/

  • Collaborate for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL). (2020). What is SEL? https://casel.org/what-is-sel/

  • Council of European Union. (2015). Joint report of the council and commission on the implementation of the renewed framework for European cooperation in the youth field (2010-18). Official Journal of the European Union, 394, 5–16.

    Google Scholar 

  • Green, J. H., Passarelli, R. E., Smith-Millman, M. K., Wagers, K., Kalomiris, A. E., & Scott, M. N. (2018). A study of an adapted social–emotional learning: Small group curriculum in a school setting. Psychology in the Schools, 56(1), 109–125.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Harris, F. (2008). Critical engagement with the deficit construction of Māori children as learners in the education system. Critical Literacy: Theories and Practices, 2(1), 44–59. http://www.criticalliteracyjournal.org/

  • Hatzichristou, C., & Lianos, P. G. (2016). Social and emotional learning in the Greek educational system: An Ithaca journey. The International Journal of Emotional Education, 8(2), 105–127.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hill, R. (2017). Bilingual education in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In O. Garcia, A. Lin, & S. May (Eds.), Bilingual and multilingual education (3rd ed., pp. 329–360). Springer.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hoffman, D. (2009). Reflecting on social emotional learning: A critical perspective on trends in the United States. Review of Educational Research, 79(2), 533–556.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jackson, A., Baxter, J., & Hakopa. (2018). Hauora Māori – He timatanga: Māori health – An introduction. In M. Reilly, S. Duncan, G. Leoni, L. Paterson, L. Carter, M. Rātima, & P. Rewi (Eds.), Te Kōparapara: An introduction to the Māori world (pp. 324–342). Auckland University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kemmis, S., & McTaggart, R. (1988). The action research planner (3rd ed.). Deakin University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Loinaz, E. S. (2019). Teachers’ perceptions and practice of social and emotional education in Greece, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. International Journal of Emotional Education, 11(1), 31–48.

    Google Scholar 

  • Macfarlane, A. (2004). The value of Māori ecologies in the study of human development. In L. Drewery & L. Bird (Eds.), Human Development in Aotearoa: A journey through life (4th ed., pp. 38–42).

    Google Scholar 

  • Macfarlane, A., Macfarlane, S., Graham, J., & Clarke, T. H. (2017). Social and emotional learning and indigenous ideologies in Aotearoa New Zealand: A biaxial blend. In E. Frydenberg, A. J. Martin, R. J. Collie, E. Frydenberg, A. J. Martin, & R. J. Collie (Eds.), Social and emotional learning in Australia and the Asia-Pacific: Perspectives, programs and approaches (pp. 273–289). Springer.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Macfarlane, A., Webber, M., Cookson-Cox, C., & McRae, H. (2014). Ka Awatea: An iwi case study of Māori students’ success. Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga.

    Google Scholar 

  • Macfarlane, S., Macfarlane, A., & Gillon, G. (2015). Sharing the food baskets of knowledge: Creating space for a blending of streams. In A. Macfarlane, S. Macfarlane, & M. Webber (Eds.), Sociocultural realities: Exploring new horizons (pp. 52–67). Canterbury University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ministry of Education. (2020, March 31). Māori medium schools. https://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/data-services/directories/maori-medium-schools

  • Noffke, S. E., & Somekh, B. (2009). The sage handbook of educational action research. Sage Publications.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • OECD. (2010). The nature of learning: Using research to inspire practice. Author. https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/the-nature-of-learning_9789264086487-en#page1

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Toole, V., & Martin, R. (2019). The role of emotions in education in Aotearoa. In A. Kamp (Ed.), Education studies in Aotearoa: Key disciplines and emerging directions (pp. 179–200). NZCER.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reiceher, H. (2010). Building inclusive education on social and emotional learning: Challenges and perspectives – A review. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 14(3), 213–246.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ross, K. M., & Tolan, P. (2018). Social and emotional learning in adolescence: Testing the CASEL model in a normative sample. Journal of Early Adolescence, 38(8), 1170–1199.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Smith, L. T. (2012). Decolonising methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples (2nd ed.). Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Taylor, R. D., Oberle, E., Durlak, J. A., & Weissberg, R. P. (2017). Promoting positive youth development through school-based social and emotional learning interventions: A meta-analysis of follow-up effects. Child Development, 88(4), 1156–1171.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • UNICEF. (2017). Building the future: Children and the sustainable development goals in rich countries (Innocenti Report Card no. 14. UNICEF Office of Research). Authors.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

The authors are extremely grateful to the students who participated in this project. We are also very thankful to teachers, who collaborated with us on this project, principals, and other community leaders, who supported this project. The research would not have been possible without the support, openness, and dedication of all involved. This project was funded by the Teaching & Learning Research Initiative (Grant Number 9186).

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Amanda Denston .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Denston, A., Fickel, L.H., Martin, R., O’Toole, V. (2022). Laying the Foundation for Wellbeing in Youth in New Zealand: Developing Socio-Emotional Understandings in Students, Families, and Teachers Through a Co-constructed Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining Framework. In: McLellan, R., Faucher, C., Simovska, V. (eds) Wellbeing and Schooling. Transdisciplinary Perspectives in Educational Research, vol 4. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-95205-1_8

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-95205-1_8

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-95204-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-95205-1

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)