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Abstract

Although there are innumerable ongoing efforts to measure, report, and improve the quality of surgical care, there is very little agreement on how to best assess quality in surgery. According to the widely used Donabedian paradigm, quality can be measured using various aspects of structure, process, and outcomes. However, each of these measures has important limitations, and new paradigms such as patient-reported outcomes are now being used as part of value-based reimbursement. In this chapter, we discuss the pros and cons of various quality metrics and make recommendations for choosing among them.

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Correspondence to Justin B. Dimick .

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Howard, R., Dimick, J.B. (2022). Defining Quality in Surgery. In: Romanelli, J.R., Dort, J.M., Kowalski, R.B., Sinha, P. (eds) The SAGES Manual of Quality, Outcomes and Patient Safety. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-94610-4_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-94610-4_1

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-94609-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-94610-4

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