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Crime Analysis and Evidence-Based Policing: Strategies for Success

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Abstract

While evidence-based policing (EBP) contains much promise for law enforcement agencies, implementation is a challenge. Crime analysts are uniquely positioned to help drive EBP within police services. Combining research knowledge with a detailed understanding of police data and analytics, they provide means by which police agencies can not only become increasingly data driven, but also to engage in their own internal research. Numerous examples illustrate this point. Crime analysts have been pivotal to the success of projects in such diverse areas as hotspot policing, focused deterrence, smart policing initiatives and problem-oriented policing, among others. This chapter discusses how analysts can become involved with developing internal evidence-based policing. It will outline how crime analysis has been integrated in policing (current practices and barriers)and how crime analysts can continue to play a key role in the future of evidence-based policing.

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Ng, J. (2022). Crime Analysis and Evidence-Based Policing: Strategies for Success. In: Bland, M., Ariel, B., Ridgeon, N. (eds) The Crime Analyst's Companion. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-94364-6_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-94364-6_5

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