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Different Kinds of Analyst

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Abstract

Most police forces now have analysts to provide operational and organisational support. The inclusion of an analyst in a team has become a staple of numerous policing tasks, from criminal investigations and business insights to supporting partnership activity through to specialist crime support, such as child sexual exploitation (CSE). This chapter examines the number and type of analyst roles and asks if the diversity of analyst roles has diluted the analytical output. The chapter draws on existing literature and examines the functions of existing analyst roles. It also considers the British College of Policing (CoP) description of the analyst role, the implementation of the Intelligence Professional Practice (IPP) and the wider expectations of the analyst role. Ultimately, the chapter provides exploratory coverage of the key analyst roles and proposes that analytical specialisms do not necessarily mean an improved service, but rather analysts need to work more closely to improve insight; individually and organisationally. It argues that analysts must embrace evidence-based policing and problem-oriented policing as essential ingredients along with placing a greater emphasis on partnership working, both internally with numerous partners, and externally to meet the changing demands of policing.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    This is based on the UK model of analyst training. It is noted that analysts in other countries (notably Canada, USA and Australia) have different training programmes and certification requirements (also see Weston et al., 2020).

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Acknowledgments

Thank you to Andrew Wright, Strategic Road Safety Partnership analyst with Lancashire Constabulary, for comments on a draft of this work.

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Correspondence to Scott Keay .

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Keay, S. (2022). Different Kinds of Analyst. In: Bland, M., Ariel, B., Ridgeon, N. (eds) The Crime Analyst's Companion. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-94364-6_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-94364-6_2

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