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Towards an Ethical Discussion of Neurotechnological Progress

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Part of the Ethics of Science and Technology Assessment book series (ETHICSSCI,volume 49)

Abstract

Over the last years, neurotechnological progress has motivated a number of theoretical and practical worries. For example, the potential misuses of neurodevices with direct access to our neural data in real time might pose a number of threats to our autonomy, free-will, agency, privacy, and liberty. In light of this—not so distant—scenario, cooperative interdisciplinary reflection is needed in order to inform conceptual, legal, and ethical challenges that arise from the way in which neurotechnological progress impacts our understanding of issues such as technology, society, the human mind, and finally, the very concept of the human person.

Keywords

  • Neurotechnologies
  • Neuroprotection
  • Human
  • Mind

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López-Silva, P., Valera, L. (2022). Towards an Ethical Discussion of Neurotechnological Progress. In: López-Silva, P., Valera, L. (eds) Protecting the Mind. Ethics of Science and Technology Assessment, vol 49. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-94032-4_1

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