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Repurposing a Reusable Learning Object on Effective Communication with Adolescents to an Interactive 360° Immersive Environment by Adapting the ASPIRE Framework

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS,volume 390)

Abstract

The efficacy of home visiting of adolescent who are at risk of self-harm has a great dependency on the communication between the patient and the healthcare professional. Face-to-face encounters with health care professional and patients have heightened importance to counteract negative COVID-19 related social isolation effect. One alternative to simulated learning is to use video sequences to recreate a variety of communication-based scenarios that may be encountered. The aim was to repurpose a web-based Reusable Learning Object (RLO) into an interactive 360° environment. This provides an immersive and interactive sense of interactivity with an adolescent. The usability of the immersive resource evaluated with 24 medical students from several institutions around the European Union. The ASPIRE framework was adapted for conversion of the initial material as the steps are flexible enough to adapt to the unique characteristics of 360° video and interactive elements. The System Usability Score (SUS) suggested the RLO had above average usability (73.5) and the Slater-Usoh-Steed Presence Questionnaire (SUS-PQ) results showed a moderate to high feeling of presence (4.6). The SUS scale suggested the RLO’s strengths were its ease of use, simplicity and rapid uptake. These 16 questions had a Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of 0.85 indicating good reliability of capturing the users’ experiences of the RLO. Discussion involved limitations of functionality and potential for Virtual Reality (VR), but with strength in the ASPIRE adaptions to facilitate the new direction of online co-creation processes.

Keywords

  • ASPIRE framework
  • Mental health
  • Education
  • Communication
  • 360 Video
  • Co-design
  • Participatory development
  • Virtual reality

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Acknowledgements

This work is supported by the ERASMUS+ Strategic Partnership in Higher Education “Co-creation of Virtual Reality reusable e-resources for European Healthcare Education (CoViRR)” (www.covirr.eu) (2018–1-UK01-KA203–048215) project of the European Union.

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Correspondence to Matthew Pears .

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Pears, M., Henderson, J., Konstantinidis, S. (2022). Repurposing a Reusable Learning Object on Effective Communication with Adolescents to an Interactive 360° Immersive Environment by Adapting the ASPIRE Framework. In: Auer, M.E., Hortsch, H., Michler, O., Köhler, T. (eds) Mobility for Smart Cities and Regional Development - Challenges for Higher Education. ICL 2021. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 390. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-93907-6_115

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