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Community Attitudes Towards Randilen Wildlife Management Area

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Tarangire: Human-Wildlife Coexistence in a Fragmented Ecosystem

Part of the book series: Ecological Studies ((ECOLSTUD,volume 243))

Abstract

Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs) are a particular conservation strategy in the Tarangire Ecosystem. WMAs aim to balance wildlife conservation with community livelihoods through the implementation of land use plans at the village level that restrict some human activities while allowing others. They also enable the central government to extract revenue from conservation tourism that occurs on village land. The creation of WMAs can lead to tensions among local communities, private investors, and government authorities as a consequence of competing interests within and across these stakeholder groups. On these grounds, WMAs have been criticized by social scientists, particularly in such instances where the resource rights of rural communities are marginalized. Few case studies to date, however, have employed representative sampling procedures and quantitative methods to assess community perspectives on WMAs. This chapter presents results from a proportionately weighted and randomly sampled survey of community attitudes towards Randilen WMA (n = 678) administered in 2020. The results speak to high levels of community support for Randilen WMA, and highlight people’s lived experiences of inclusion in conservation governance and management. Drawing from these findings, this chapter forwards an alternative perspective on WMAs, suggesting that they can show promise as mechanisms for reducing rangeland fragmentation and supporting people, livestock and wildlife.

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Acknowledgments

Ethical review for this study was carried out by McGill University (REB File #: 479-0419). Clearance to conduct field research in Tanzania was issued by COSTECH (Permit No. 2019-426-NA-2019-299), and permissions were also provided by Arusha Regional Government, Monduli District Council, and the Village Councils of each member village. Funding in support of fieldwork was provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Canadian International Development Agency via the ICAN (Institutional Canopy of Conservation) project, a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship, and a Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement. Field research was also supported by the McGill Institute for the Study of International Development (ISID), a Schull-Yang International Experience Award, and a Salisbury Award from the Canadian Anthropology Society (CASCA). The author is very grateful to the Randilen WMA community members who participated in this study, to his NGO collaborators (Honeyguide and UCRT), to Edwine Ole Maingo for his dedicated field assistance, to his doctoral supervisor John Galaty for his ongoing support, and to Christian Kiffner for preparing the figures.

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Correspondence to Justin Raycraft .

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Raycraft, J. (2022). Community Attitudes Towards Randilen Wildlife Management Area. In: Kiffner, C., Bond, M.L., Lee, D.E. (eds) Tarangire: Human-Wildlife Coexistence in a Fragmented Ecosystem. Ecological Studies, vol 243. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-93604-4_6

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