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Digital Government Research: A Diverse Domain

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Part of the Public Administration and Information Technology book series (PAIT,volume 38)

Abstract

As formulated in the Digital Government Society’s mission statement of 2006, Digital Government refers to “the use of information technology to support government operations, engage citizens, and provide government services.” Although the term “digital” as opposed to “analog” implicitly establishes a relationship between (digital) modern “information and communication technology (ICT)” and “government,” the scope and the various dimensions of Digital Government extend to more than just uses of ICTs in the public sector but rather induce and help transport transformational changes in how the business of government is conducted. This, it appears, holds for all types (democratic or not), all aspects, all levels, and all branches of government. In this chapter, the evolutionary path of Digital Government is accounted for, and the unfolding of the research tradition that accompanied, and sometimes guided, the emerging practice is described. Digital Government Research (DGR) started from humble beginnings to what is now the intermediary present. The chapter provides a projection and a preview of where this rapidly growing multi-disciplinary domain of research and practice might be headed in the next two decades. As it appears, the transformation of the business of government is only in its early phase, and major trends of transitions and transformation are observable.

Keywords

  • Digitization
  • Digitalization
  • Digital government research directions
  • Multi-disciplinary research
  • Government surveillance

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Scholl, H.J. (2022). Digital Government Research: A Diverse Domain. In: Charalabidis, Y., Flak, L.S., Viale Pereira, G. (eds) Scientific Foundations of Digital Governance and Transformation. Public Administration and Information Technology, vol 38. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-92945-9_3

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