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Biomarkers, Between Diagnosis and Prognosis

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Abstract

Perinatal depression is a heterogeneous disorder with differences in depression timing onset, symptomology, severity and treatment efficacy. The early individuation of mental health disease in women is mandatory to prevent a long duration of untreated illness, long-term consequences on offspring and maternal health effects in terms of mortality and morbidity.

Different biomarkers have been linked to perinatal depression, however no definitive conclusions can be done due to several variables involved in psychiatric disorder onset but also to the different methodological methods used in the studies.

The aim of this chapter is to outline the actual state of the art on biomarkers in perinatal depression, although being not comprehensive of all available data in literature, in order to search for reliable biomarkers able to early detect it and prevent its consequences on newborns.

Keywords

  • Perinatal depression
  • Biomarkers
  • Women’s mental health
  • Prevention

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Serati, M., Buoli, M., Barkin, J.L. (2022). Biomarkers, Between Diagnosis and Prognosis. In: Percudani, M., Bramante, A., Brenna, V., Pariante, C. (eds) Key Topics in Perinatal Mental Health. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-91832-3_26

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