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Why Games and Climate Change?

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in Media and Environmental Communication book series (PSMEC)

Abstract

This chapter introduces the connections between games and climate change, grounding the project in ecological thinking and arguments about the intertwined nature of climate change with capitalism. It draws on theory from feminist ecology, indigenous perspectives on land, and science and technology studies. The chapter also provides a summary of the arguments contained in the remaining chapters.

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Correspondence to Benjamin J. Abraham .

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Abraham, B.J. (2022). Why Games and Climate Change?. In: Digital Games After Climate Change. Palgrave Studies in Media and Environmental Communication. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-91705-0_1

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