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Innovating in Renewable Energy

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Abstract

Why has modern renewable energy grown fast during the last fifty years, although it is considered high cost, low energy density, and intermittent? An answer refers to the decision-making of individuals, organisations, and authorities. Data on investments, consumption, prices, subsidies, social initiatives, and firms in the past were used to assess the impacts of energy prices, policy support for fossil fuels and for renewable energy as well as entrepreneurial initiatives on modern renewable energy. A few patterns in the countries’ decision-making about modern renewable energy are underpinned. The cost-reducing technical change as a result of large investments in wind and solar energy is estimated and the benefits of applications are assessed.

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Krozer, Y. (2022). Innovating in Renewable Energy. In: Economics of Renewable Energy. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-90804-1_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-90804-1_5

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