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Evolution of Additive Manufacturing Processes: From the Background to Hybrid Printers

Part of the Materials Forming, Machining and Tribology book series (MFMT)

Abstract

The Additive Manufacturing (AM) field is revolutionizing the industrial sector in different areas such as automotive, aeronautics, medicine, etc. Many patents about AM processes were granted at the end of the XXth century. However, until their release, the use of AM was very limited, mainly because of the high cost of the equipment. From that moment on, many 3D printing technologies started to bloom and, along with it, the commercialization of new 3D printers, including hybrid 3D printers. They are defined as a combination of AM and subtractive technologies within the same machine, but also as a merge of different AM technologies. With all this in mind, the present chapter first presents an overview of the different AM technologies, as well as the history of AM, including recent advances. Then, the description of the possible future trends with the use of hybrid 3D printers is discussed.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank the CIM UPC for the technical support regarding the development of the hybrid printers. The present chapter was co-financed by the European Union Regional Development Fund within the framework of the ERDF Operational Program of Catalonia 2014-2020, with a grant of 50% of total cost eligible, project BASE3D, grant number 001-P-001646.

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Buj-Corral, I., Tejo-Otero, A., Fenollosa-Artés, F. (2022). Evolution of Additive Manufacturing Processes: From the Background to Hybrid Printers. In: Davim, J.P. (eds) Mechanical and Industrial Engineering. Materials Forming, Machining and Tribology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-90487-6_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-90487-6_3

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