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An Analysis of the Persuasive Technology Design Features that Support Behavioural Change

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems book series (LNNS,volume 360)

Abstract

Persuasive Technologies (PTs) are designed to change attitudes or behaviours of the users through persuasion and social influence. Recent studies have espoused the need for integrating design features in PTs to motivate users to perform desired action. However, the efficacy of these design features has not been empirically tested. This study seeks to assess whether the planned integration of design features into PTs lead to behaviour change. The study adopted the Persuasive Systems Design (PSD) model and empirically tested the design features among 150 Ghanaian Junior High School (JHS) students who were exposed to an interactive mathematic software program. All four constructs of the model; primary task support, dialogue support, system credibility support, and social support were all found to significantly influence behavioural change. However, social support had the most impact whilst dialogue support had the least impact on actual behavior change. Future studies can assess the applicability of the model with different user groups and in other jurisdictions.

Keywords

  • Persuasive technologies
  • Behavior change
  • Design features
  • Human computer interaction
  • Conceptual research
  • Socio-technical systems

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Correspondence to Alexander Asmah .

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Asmah, A., Ofoeda, J., Agbozo, E. (2022). An Analysis of the Persuasive Technology Design Features that Support Behavioural Change. In: Arai, K. (eds) Proceedings of the Future Technologies Conference (FTC) 2021, Volume 3. FTC 2021. Lecture Notes in Networks and Systems, vol 360. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-89912-7_56

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