Skip to main content

An Introduction to Simulation Training Through the Lens of Experience and Activity Analysis

Part of the Professional and Practice-based Learning book series (PPBL,volume 30)

Abstract:

This opening chapter offers an overview of the conditions under which experience and activity can be fruitful objects for examining what occurs in simulation training, understanding participants’ learning and development processes, and deriving robust design principles. It is argued that this approach is particularly useful in the field of simulation training, especially when achieving high standards of operational performance is complicated by critical issues (health, safety, security, protection, etc.) and difficult working environments (dynamic, uncertain, high-risk, etc.). We show that this approach is able to integrate authentic, embodied, and embedded practice experiences with domain-related or cross-cutting learning content. We also provide key concepts that can guide readers in understanding how simulation-enhanced learning and development processes are studied and how the different ways of enabling trainees to construct usable knowledge in verisimilar contexts are derived from these studies. The organization of the book sections and chapters are then presented. In sum, this opening chapter introduces the purpose of the book, explains why the research presented here fills an important knowledge gap, and suggests ways that readers might profitably engage with its contents.

Keywords

  • Simulation training
  • Vocational training
  • Training design
  • Experience
  • Activity analysis
  • Ergonomics

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-89567-9_1
  • Chapter length: 23 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-89567-9
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   149.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Notes

  1. 1.

    The notion of skill is used here to highlight the characteristics of the tasks to be performed, and this usage is different from that found later in this introduction.

  2. 2.

    The notion of professional competence used in French, which is often translated by the term “skill” in English, refers to the dimensions of activity mobilized to carry out tasks, to accomplish a mission. Bainbridge and Ruiz Quintanilla (1989) discussed the different meanings of the term skill in English and French cognitive ergonomics.

  3. 3.

    Many authors use the term “French-speaking ergonomists” to designate this line of research. In order to avoid overlooking a large part of our colleagues who contribute and enrich this approach, we prefer the term “ergonomics of activity.”

  4. 4.

    Unpaged document.

References

  • Bainbridge, L., & Ruiz Quintanilla, S. A. (Eds.). (1989). Developing skills with information technology. John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

    Google Scholar 

  • Baker, S., & Marshall, E. (1989). Simulators for training and the evaluation of operator performance. In L. Bainbridge & S. A. Ruiz Quintanilla (Eds.), Developing skills with information technology (pp. 293–312). John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

    Google Scholar 

  • Béguin, P., & Pastré, P. (2002). Working, learning and designing through simulation. In S. Bagnara, S. Pozzi, A. Rizzo, & P. Wright (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics (ECCE’11): «Cognition, culture and design» (pp. 5–13). CNR, Istituto di Scienze e technologie della cognizione.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bobillier Chaumon, M.-E., Rouat, S., Laneyrie, E., & Cuvillier, B. (2018). De l’activité DE simulation à l’activité EN simulation: simuler pour stimuler. Activités, 15–11.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boshuizen, H. P. A., Schmidt, H. G., Custers, J. F. M., & Van de Wiel, M. W. (1995). Knowledge development and restructuring in the domaine of medicine: The role of theory and practice. Learn Instr, 24(4), 269–289.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Brehmer, B., & Dörner, D. (1993). Experiment with computer simulated micro worlds: Escaping both the narrow starts of the laboratory and the deep blue see of the field study. Comput Hum Behav, 9, 171–184.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Chernikova, O., Heitzmann, N., Stadler, M., Holzberger, D., Seidel, T., & Fischer, F. (2020). Simulation-based learning in higher education: A meta-analysis. Rev Educ Res, 90(4), 499–541. https://doi.org/10.3102/0034654320933544

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Danielllou, F. (2005). The French-speaking ergonomists’ approach to work activity: Cross-influences of field intervention and conceptual models. Theor Issues Ergon Sci, 6(5), 409–427. https://doi.org/10.1080/14639220500078252

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Daniellou, F., & Rabardel, P. (2005). Activity-oriented approaches to ergonomics: Some traditions and communities. Theor Issues Ergon Sci, 6(5), 353–357. https://doi.org/10.1080/14639220500078351

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Drews, F. A., & Bakdash, J. Z. (2013). Simulation training in health care. Reviews of Human Factors and Ergonomics, 8, 191–234.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Durand, M., & Poizat, G. (2015). An activity-centered approach to work analysis and the Design of Vocational. Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Filliettaz, L., & Billett, S. (Eds.). (2015). Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices (pp. 221–240). Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Filliettaz, L., Billett, S., Bourgeois, E., Durand, M., & Poizat, G. (2015). Conceptualising and connecting francophone perspectives on learning through and for work. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices (pp. 19–48). Springer.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hamstra, S., Brydges, R., Hatala, R., Zendejas, B., & Cook, D. (2014). Reconsidering fidelity in simulation-based training. Acad Med, 89(3), 387–392. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000000130

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hoc, J.-M. (2001). Toward ecological validity of research in cognitive ergonomics. Theor Issues Ergon Sci, 2, 278–288.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hoc, J.-M., Cacciabue, P. C., & Hollnagel, E. (Eds.). (1995). Expertise and technology: Cognition & humancomputer cooperation. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hill., R-R. & Tolk., A. (2017). A history of military computer simulation. In A. Tolk, J. Fowler, G. Shao, & E. Yücesan (Eds.), Advances in Modeling and simulation, simulation foundations, methods and applications (pp. 277–296). Springer International Publishing AG.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hollnagel, E. (2012). Resilience engineering and crisis management. https://gnssn.iaea.org/NSNI/SC/TMMtU/Presentations/Mr%20Hollnagel%27s%20Presentation%202.pdf

  • Leplat, J. (1989). Simulation and simulators in training: Some comments. In L. Bainbridge & S. A. Ruiz Quintanilla (Eds.), Developing skills with information technology (pp. 277–292). John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

    Google Scholar 

  • Norros, L. (1989). Simulation in industrial work and training. In L. Bainbridge & S. A. Ruiz Quintanilla (Eds.), Developing skills with information technology (pp. 315–327). John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

    Google Scholar 

  • Norros, L. (2005). The concept of habit in the analysis of situated actions. Theor Issues Ergon Sci, 6(5), 385–407. https://doi.org/10.1080/14639220500076520

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Norros, L. (2014). Developing human factors/ergonomics as a design discipline. Appl Ergon, 45, 61–71.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ouellet, S., & Vézina, N. (2015). Activity analysis and workplace training: An ergonomic perspective. In L. Filliettaz & S. Billett (Eds.), Francophone perspectives of learning through work: Conceptions, traditions and practices (pp. 241–256). Springer.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Patrick, J. (1992). Training, Research & practice. Academic press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rogalski, J. (1995). From real situations to training situations: Conserving the functionalities. In J.-M. Hoc, P. C. Cacciabue, & E. Hollnagel (Eds.), Expertise and technology: Cognition & human-computer cooperation (pp. 125–139). Laurence Erlbaum Associate.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pastré, P. (2005). La conception de situations didactiques à la lumière de la théorie de la conceptualisation dans l’action. In D. P. Rabardel & P. Pastré (Eds.), Modèles du sujet pour la conception. Dialectiques activité développement (pp. 73–107). Octarès.

    Google Scholar 

  • Persson, J. (2017). A review of the design and development processes of simulation for training in healthcare. A technology-centered versus human-centered perspective. Appl Ergon, 58, 314–326.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rogalski, J., Plat, M., & Antolin-Glenn, P. (2002). Training for collective competence in rare and unpredictable situations. In N. Boreham, R. Samurçay, & M. Fischer (Eds.), Work process knowledge (pp. 134–147). Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rosen, K. (2013). The history of simulation. In A. I. Levine, S. DeMaria, A. D. Schwartz, & A. J. Sim (Eds.), The comprehensive textbook of healthcare simulation (pp. 5–49). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5993-4_2

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Salas, E., & Cannon-Bowers, J. A. (2001). The science of training: A decade of Progress. Annu Rev Psychol, 52, 471–499.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Salas, E., Tannenbaum, S. I., Kraiger, K., & Smith-Jentsch, K. A. (2012). The science of training and development in organizations: What matters in practice. Psychol Sci Public Interest, 13(2), 74–101.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Schmidt, H. G., Boshuizen, H. P. A., & Hobus, P. P. M. (1988). Transitorily stages in the development of médical expertise: The «intermediate effect» in clinical case representation studies. In Proceedings of the cognitive science society meeting. Lawrence Erlbaum.

    Google Scholar 

  • Teiger, C., & Lacomblez, M. (Eds.). (2013). (Se) Former pour transformer le travail: Dynamiques de construction d’une analyse critique du travail. Presses Universitaires de Laval & European Trade Union Institute.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tourmen, C., Holgado, O., Métral, J., et al. (2017). The Piagetian Schème: A framework to study professional learning through conceptualization. Vocat Learn, 10(3), 343–364. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12186-017-9174-y

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ughetto, P., Haradji, Y., & Van Belleghem, L. (2018). Introduction au dossier “mettre en scène l’activité: les nouvelles figures de la simulation”. Activités, 15, 1.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vadcard, L. (2022). Gestes techniques et formation. Un point de vue didactique. PUG.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van Daele, A. (1997). Contribution de la simulation à l’étude de l’activité de l’opérateur en situation dynamique. In P. Beguin & A. Weill-Fassina (Eds.), La simulation en ergonomie: connaître, agir et interagir (pp. 29–38). Octarès.

    Google Scholar 

  • Van de Wiel, M. W. J., Boshuizen, H. P. A., & Schmidt, H. G. (2000). Knowledge restructuring in expertise development: Evidence from pathophysiological representations of clinical cases by students and physicians. Eur J Cogn Psychol, 12(3), 323–355.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vergnaud, G. (2009). The theory of conceptual fields. Hum Dev, 52, 83–94. https://doi.org/10.1159/000202727

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vidal-Gomel, C., Boccara, V., Delgoulet, C., & Cau-Bareille, D. (2019). How holistic approaches of activity analysis in ergonomics renew training design? In D. S. Bagnara, R. Tartaglia, S. Albolino, T. Alexander, & Y. Fujita (Eds.), Proceedings of the 20th congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018). Volume IV: Organizational Design and Management (ODAM), Professional Affairs (pp. 233–241). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-96080-727

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vygotski, L. (1928–1931/2014). Histoire du développement des fonctions psychiques supérieures. La Dispute.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vygotsky, L. S. (1934/1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Yardley, S., Teunissen, P.-W., & Dornan, T. (2012). Experiential learning: AMEE guide n° 63. Med Teacher, 34, 102–115.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Simon Flandin .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Flandin, S., Vidal-Gomel, C., Ortega, R.B. (2022). An Introduction to Simulation Training Through the Lens of Experience and Activity Analysis. In: Flandin, S., Vidal-Gomel, C., Becerril Ortega, R. (eds) Simulation Training through the Lens of Experience and Activity Analysis. Professional and Practice-based Learning, vol 30. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-89567-9_1

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-89567-9_1

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-89566-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-89567-9

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)