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“A Counterforce Against Hate”: A Discursive Analysis of Affective Practices in Mobilization Against the Radical Right in a Context of White Innocence

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Discursive Psychology book series (PSDP)

Abstract

The chapter develops an analysis of affective practice in the context of antiracist mobilization against the radical right’s racism. More precisely, the chapter focuses on formative discussions by supporters of Silakkaliike (Baltic herring movement), an antiracist online mobilization against the radical right, which gained significant support after its founding in early 2020. The analysis draws on observations made in critical theorization of race, racism and antiracism—namely a tendency to focus on extremist forms of racism and relative silence on racialized reality—and combines these with discursive psychological notion of affective practice. The chapter argues that the analysed antiracism is mediated by affective practices refraining from hate and other emotions, disgust and hope.

Keywords

  • Affective practice
  • Anti-racism
  • Social media activism

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Correspondence to Minna Seikkula .

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Seikkula, M. (2022). “A Counterforce Against Hate”: A Discursive Analysis of Affective Practices in Mobilization Against the Radical Right in a Context of White Innocence. In: Pettersson, K., Nortio, E. (eds) The Far-Right Discourse of Multiculturalism in Intergroup Interactions. Palgrave Studies in Discursive Psychology. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-89066-7_9

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