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A Critical Discursive Psychological Study of Dialogical Constructions of Hate-Speech in Established Media and Online Discussions

Part of the Palgrave Studies in Discursive Psychology book series (PSDP)

Abstract

This chapter examines the construction of meanings related to hate-speech in a talk show broadcast on Finnish television in 2016, and its reception—rejection, acceptance and re-construction—by social media users. The analytical approach relies on critical discursive psychology and investigates the dialogical construction of interpretative repertoires, ideological dilemmas and subject positions between an elite-led TV discussion and grassroot-level everyday online discussions. The representations of hate speech and hate speakers are polarized in the elite and lay discussions. This hegemonic version associating hate-speech with discrimination and racism in the TV show is challenged by social media users by portraying hate speech as an ‘invention’ and a ‘weapon’ of ‘the tolerant’.

Keywords

  • Hate speech
  • Social representations
  • Critical discursive psychology
  • Established media and social media
  • Production and reception

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Correspondence to Inari Sakki .

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Sakki, I., Hakoköngäs, E. (2022). A Critical Discursive Psychological Study of Dialogical Constructions of Hate-Speech in Established Media and Online Discussions. In: Pettersson, K., Nortio, E. (eds) The Far-Right Discourse of Multiculturalism in Intergroup Interactions. Palgrave Studies in Discursive Psychology. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-89066-7_4

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