Skip to main content

The Cyberspace Strikes Back: An Ontological Account of Social Networks

  • 126 Accesses

Abstract

This chapter argues that the Web, as well as social networks such as Facebook or Twitter, deserve to be subsumed under the notion of cyberspace since they have a special ontological status with respect to garden-variety technical artifacts. While the latter artifacts belong to two distinct ontological categories, namely, concrete particulars and types, social networks are rather abstract particulars, and this entitles us to cast them as sui generis spaces, namely, cyberspaces.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-88793-3_2
  • Chapter length: 17 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   89.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-88793-3
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   119.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

References

  • Benjamin, W. (1936/2008). The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility, English translation: in The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility and Other Writings on Media. Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carpo, M. (2011). The Alphabet and the Algorithm. MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carpo, M. (2020, March). Rise of the Machines. Artforum, pp. 172–180

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, N. (1998). A Philosophy of Mass Art. Clarendon Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chalmers, D. (2005). The Matrix as Metaphysics. In C. Grau (Ed.), Philosophers Explore the Matrix (pp. 132–176). Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chalmers, D. (2018). The Virtual and the Real. Disputatio, 9(4), 309–352.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dodd, J. (2007). Works of Music: An Essay in Ontology. Oxford University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Elder, C. (2004). Real Natures and Familiar Objects. MIT Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Evans, G. (1985). Molyneux’s Question. In Collected Papers (pp. 364–399). Clarendon.

    Google Scholar 

  • Evnine, S. (2016). Making Objects and Events: A Hylomorphic Theory of Artifacts, Actions, and Organisms. Oxford University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Evnine, S. (2019). Mass Production. In B. Brewer & J. Cumpa (Eds.), The Nature of Ordinary Objects (pp. 198–222). Cambridge University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Gibson, W. (1982, July). Burning Chrome. Omni.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gibson, W. (1984). Neuromancer. Harper.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kania, A. (2018). Why Gamers Are Not Performers. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 76(2), 187–199.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Kittler, F. (1986/1999). Gramophone Film Typewriter. English Translation. Stanford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kneale, D. (1996, September 26). From the Man Who Named Cyberspace, a New Trip. Wall Street Journal, Eastern Edition. https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB843620903987895000

  • Koepsell, D. R. (2000). The Ontology of Cyberspace: Philosophy, Law, and the Future of Intellectual Property. Open Court Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lillemose, J., & Kryger, M. (2015). The (Re)invention of Cyberspace. Nordic Art Review, https://kunstkritikk.com/thereinvention-of-cyberspace/

  • Millikan, R. G. (2000). On Clear and Confused Ideas: An Essay about Substance Concepts. Cambridge University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Morningstar, C., & Farmer, F. R. (2008). The Lessons of Lucasfilm’s Habitat. Journal for Virtual Worlds Research, 1(1), 1–21.

    Google Scholar 

  • Quine, W. V. O. (1953). From a Logical Point of View. Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sider, T. (2011). Writing the Book of the World. Oxford University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Strawson, P. F. (1959). Individuals. Methuen.

    Google Scholar 

  • Strawson, P. F. (1966). The Bounds of Sense: An Essay on Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Methuen.

    Google Scholar 

  • Terrone, E. (2014). The Digital Secret of the Moving Image. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics, LI/VII(1), 21–41.

    Google Scholar 

  • Terrone, E. (2018). Appearance and History: The Autographic/Allographic Distinction Revisited. The British Journal of Aesthetics, 58(1), 71–87.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wollheim, R. (1980). Art and its Objects: An Introduction to Aesthetics, 2nd ed.. Revised. Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wolterstorff, N. (1980). Works and Worlds of Art. Clarendon Press.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Enrico Terrone .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2022 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Terrone, E. (2022). The Cyberspace Strikes Back: An Ontological Account of Social Networks. In: Terrone, E., Tripodi, V. (eds) Being and Value in Technology. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-88793-3_2

Download citation