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“Isn’t It Pretty to Think So?”—Disability and the Queering of Masculinity in Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover

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Part of the Palgrave Studies in (Re)Presenting Gender book series (PSRG)

Abstract

Martina Kübler’s contribution reads the disabled male white body through the lens of Queer Theory and analyzes its oscillation between several levels of signification: Focusing her analysis on Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises (1926) and D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover (1928), she shows how disability can serve as a metaphor to construe ‘masculinity in crisis’ or to deconstruct a supposedly stable hegemonic masculinity through its association with femininity and homosexuality. Yet, her innovative take on the subject also illustrates that disability, as a differential category, can interact with constructions of masculinity in more productive ways: here, the material effects of impairment, particularly impotence, can foster non-normative ways of knowing, being, and experiencing the world by challenging the ‘normal’, the ‘heterosexual’, and the ‘masculine’ and ultimately inspire more creative—queer—ways of being.

Keywords

  • Queer masculinities
  • Disability
  • Impotence
  • Ernest Hemingway
  • D.H. Lawrence

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Notes

  1. 1.

    For this line of argument see, for example: Rudat (1984, 33–36), Gladstein (1986), and Bak (2009).

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Kübler, M. (2022). “Isn’t It Pretty to Think So?”—Disability and the Queering of Masculinity in Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and D.H. Lawrence’s Lady Chatterley’s Lover. In: Dexl, C., Gerlsbeck, S. (eds) The Male Body in Representation. Palgrave Studies in (Re)Presenting Gender. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-88604-2_13

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