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Rethinking the (Wool) Economy

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Local, Slow and Sustainable Fashion

Abstract

This chapter examines the limits to changing the current economic system through policy measures like green growth and the circular economy. We examine the biophysical aspects of the economy and the huge amounts of materials and energy the global economy consumes to achieve growth. Thus far, governmental responses have been incapable of addressing the underlying structural issues of the global textile industry and the accompanying exploitation of nature and peoples. While the necessary deep structural transformations are difficult to achieve through governmental policy change, we suggest that re-localisation of wool production-consumption networks is an expression of how engaged citizens can build more sustainable textile and fibre alternatives in place. Drawing on local food research, this chapter highlights the dangers of conflating local solutions with sustainability. Instead, we argue that assessing these emergent wool ventures based on how they are organised in the living landscape in specific places will enhance the understanding of what kind of socioecological impacts they can achieve. This includes how organising/connecting the activities and visions of wool entrepreneurs in place is essential if these ventures are going to be able to overcome the barriers set by the dominant growth-based system of global trade.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    https://muho.no/lyngheisenteret/en/about-us.

  2. 2.

    Norwegian expression describing community work.

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Smith, T., Ehrnström-Fuentes, M., Hagolani-Albov, S.E., Klepp, I.G., Tobiasson, T.S. (2022). Rethinking the (Wool) Economy. In: Klepp, I.G., Tobiasson, T.S. (eds) Local, Slow and Sustainable Fashion . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-88300-3_6

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