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Part of the book series: Educational Linguistics ((EDUL,volume 55))

Abstract

The vision for this book Activating Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in the Language Classroom began 7 years before its publication. In 2014, the co-editors, all researchers in the area of Language Education (LE), gathered at a symposium organized by Enrica Piccardo at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto, along with other researchers and language educators. The symposium had an ambitious goal: to address potential challenges and opportunities offered by superdiverse societies and the consequent need to rethink language use, language learning, and language teaching. Having, between us, taught languages and conducted research in different contexts including North and South America, Europe, and Asia, we synergically identified the need for a reconceptualization of LE, one that more fully aligned with the types of multilingual and multicultural social realities that we had been operating in, where individuals from diverse backgrounds use linguistic, cultural and other semiotic resources to communicate and make sense of the world. This need led us to embark on a long and rewarding journey of new learnings from different ontologies, epistemologies, disciplines, and lived experiences through a Social Sciences Research Council of Canada’s (SSHRC) funded project titled LINguistic and Cultural DIversity REinvented, or LINCDIRE for short. All 25 authors who contributed to this book have been part of the LINCDIRE project, informing diverse ways of co-constructing knowledge and working collaboratively as a large team.

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Galante, A., Schmor, R. (2022). Introduction. In: Piccardo, E., Lawrence, G., Germain-Rutherford, A., Galante, A. (eds) Activating Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in the Language Classroom . Educational Linguistics, vol 55. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-87124-6_1

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